4. Celestial Mechanics

  1. Peter Fortescue1,
  2. Graham Swinerd1 and
  3. John Stark2
  1. John P. W. Stark2,
  2. Graham G. Swinerd1 and
  3. Peter W. Fortescue1

Published Online: 12 AUG 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781119971009.ch4

Spacecraft Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition

Spacecraft Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition

How to Cite

Stark, J. P. W., Swinerd, G. G. and Fortescue, P. W. (2011) Celestial Mechanics, in Spacecraft Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition (eds P. Fortescue, G. Swinerd and J. Stark), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119971009.ch4

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Aeronautics and Astronautics, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, UK

  2. 2

    School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    Aeronautics and Astronautics, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, UK

  2. 2

    School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 AUG 2011
  2. Published Print: 12 AUG 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470750124

Online ISBN: 9781119971009

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • celestial mechanics - and theory, spacecraft's orbital motion;
  • mutual gravitational force of attraction - between any two bodies;
  • theory of celestial mechanics - motion of a spacecraft prediction;
  • two-body problem—particle dynamics - motion of two co-rotating point masses;
  • Kepler's equation, simple relationship - time and position;
  • hyperbolic trajectory;
  • orbit perturbations on space vehicles - not included in Keplerian formulation;
  • atmospheric drag - for low Earth-orbiting spacecraft;
  • solar radiation pressure (SRP) perturbations

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • The Two-body Problem—Particle Dynamics

  • Specifying the Orbit

  • Orbit Perturbations

  • Restricted Three-body Problem