24. Imaging of the Hemophilic Joint

  1. Emérito-Carlos Rodríguez-Merchán MD, PHD2,3 and
  2. Leonard A. Valentino MD4
  1. Carmen Martin-Hervás MD, PhD1,3 and
  2. Emérito-Carlos Rodríguez-Merchán MD, PHD2,3

Published Online: 12 MAY 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781119979401.ch24

Current and Future Issues in Hemophilia Care

Current and Future Issues in Hemophilia Care

How to Cite

Martin-Hervás, C. and Rodríguez-Merchán, E.-C. (2011) Imaging of the Hemophilic Joint, in Current and Future Issues in Hemophilia Care (eds E.-C. Rodríguez-Merchán and L. A. Valentino), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119979401.ch24

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Hemophilia Unit, La Paz University Hospital, Spain

  2. 3

    School of Medicine, Autonomous University, Madrid, Spain

  3. 4

    Hemophilia and Thrombophilia Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Musculo-Skeletal Radiology, La Paz University Hospital, Spain

  2. 2

    Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Hemophilia Unit, La Paz University Hospital, Spain

  3. 3

    School of Medicine, Autonomous University, Madrid, Spain

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 MAY 2011
  2. Published Print: 13 MAY 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470670576

Online ISBN: 9781119979401

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • Hemophilia;
  • arthropathy;
  • joint disease;
  • hemarthrosis;
  • synovitis;
  • radiography;
  • Doppler ultrasonography;
  • magnetic resonance imaging;
  • computed tomography;
  • nuclear medicine

Summary

In spite of the fact that the diagnosis of hemophilia is essentially clinical and laboratory-based, imaging has become an important tool for the objective evaluation of complications, diagnostic confirmation, stage and/or complementation and therapeutic follow-up in hemophilic arthropathy (HA). Conventional radiography (X-ray) is useful to monitor advanced stages of the disease once considerable cartilage and/or bone damage has occurred in the joint. Ultrasonography (US) Doppler can be used as a complementary technique to assess and follow up the soft-tissue changes of the arthropathy. In the initial stages of hemophilia, US permit the differentiation between effusion and synovial thickening. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with its excellent soft-tissue contrast, can accurately evaluate the early changes and the less advanced joint damage seen in patients receiving prophylactic therapy. MRI is the imaging method of choice for detecting the abnormalities of HA, staging their severity, and following the effects of treatment.