Introduction: Changing the Questions in Avian Paleontology

  1. Gareth Dyke1 and
  2. Gary Kaiser2
  1. Gary Kaiser2 and
  2. Gareth Dyke1

Published Online: 20 APR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781119990475.ch

Living Dinosaurs: The Evolutionary History of Modern Birds

Living Dinosaurs: The Evolutionary History of Modern Birds

How to Cite

Kaiser, G. and Dyke, G. (2011) Introduction: Changing the Questions in Avian Paleontology, in Living Dinosaurs: The Evolutionary History of Modern Birds (eds G. Dyke and G. Kaiser), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119990475.ch

Editor Information

  1. 1

    University College Dublin, Ireland

  2. 2

    Royal British Columbia Museum, Victoria, Canada

Author Information

  1. 1

    University College Dublin, Ireland

  2. 2

    Royal British Columbia Museum, Victoria, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 20 APR 2011
  2. Published Print: 8 APR 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470656662

Online ISBN: 9781119990475

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Keywords:

  • changing the questions in avian paleontology;
  • precise nature of the earliest birds - the most contentious topics in biology;
  • genomic analyses, and genetic history of the chicken - insight into ancient history of birds, events when avian lineage diverged from that of mammals;
  • fossil record of terrestrial animals in Paleocene - weak, biomolecular insights, best chance of understanding post-Mesozoic survival;
  • birds, that followed Archaeopteryx - in Early Cretaceous, being very dinosaur-like;
  • new approaches to cladistic analyses - of morphological characters, Archaeopteryx secure in its position as the earliest bird;
  • Archaeopteryx, earliest evidence for feathered wings - with asymmetric feathers, generating some useful thrust in flapping flight;
  • membrane-winged pterosaurs - most diverse groups of flying animals in the Cretaceous;
  • other named fossils from the Cretaceous - representatives of living lineages, Palintropus, Lonchodytes, Tytthostonyx - remaining contentious;
  • 100 Ma wing in Mongolia's Gobi Desert and fossil from Cretaceous deposits in Antarctica - oldest known representatives of the living order Anseriformes

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • References