26. Challenges in Child and Adolescent Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

  1. David Skuse5,6,
  2. Helen Bruce7,8,
  3. Linda Dowdney5 and
  4. David Mrazek9
  1. Elaine Chung1 and
  2. Isobel Heyman2,3,4

Published Online: 31 MAY 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781119993971.ch26

Child Psychology and Psychiatry: Frameworks for Practice, Second Edition

Child Psychology and Psychiatry: Frameworks for Practice, Second Edition

How to Cite

Chung, E. and Heyman, I. (2011) Challenges in Child and Adolescent Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, in Child Psychology and Psychiatry: Frameworks for Practice, Second Edition (eds D. Skuse, H. Bruce, L. Dowdney and D. Mrazek), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119993971.ch26

Editor Information

  1. 5

    Institute of Child Health, University College London, 30 Guilford Street, London, WC1N 1EH, UK

  2. 6

    Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London, UK

  3. 7

    East London NHS Foundation Trust, UK

  4. 8

    London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK

  5. 9

    Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service, The, Royal Free Hospital, Pond Street, London, NW3, 2QG, UK

  2. 2

    National and Specialist Child and Adolescent, Mental Health Services, South London, UK

  3. 3

    Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, Denmark Hill, London SE5 8AZ UK

  4. 4

    Children's Department, Institute of Psychiatry, DeCrespigny Park, London SE5 8AF UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 31 MAY 2011
  2. Published Print: 17 JUN 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470973820

Online ISBN: 9781119993971

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Keywords:

  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder;
  • children;
  • adolescents;
  • cognitive behaviour therapy;
  • exposure and response prevention;
  • pharmacotherapy

Summary

Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a neurobiological disorder, with a prevalence in children and adolescents of about 1%. It can initially be hidden by sufferers, but cause distress, impact upon family life, social activities and education, and become chronic and severe. Nonetheless it is very treatable, both with cognitive behaviour therapy incorporating exposure and response prevention, and SSRI medication. A developmental approach to both assessment and treatment should be undertaken in children and young people, and it is helpful to involve family members.