31. Eating Disorders in Adolescence

  1. David Skuse2,3,
  2. Helen Bruce4,5,
  3. Linda Dowdney2 and
  4. David Mrazek6
  1. Dasha Nicholls

Published Online: 2 JUN 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781119993971.ch31

Child Psychology and Psychiatry: Frameworks for Practice, Second Edition

Child Psychology and Psychiatry: Frameworks for Practice, Second Edition

How to Cite

Nicholls, D. (2011) Eating Disorders in Adolescence, in Child Psychology and Psychiatry: Frameworks for Practice, Second Edition (eds D. Skuse, H. Bruce, L. Dowdney and D. Mrazek), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119993971.ch31

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Institute of Child Health, University College London, 30 Guilford Street, London, WC1N 1EH, UK

  2. 3

    Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London, UK

  3. 4

    East London NHS Foundation Trust, UK

  4. 5

    London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK

  5. 6

    Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Child and Adolescent Mental, Health, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, Great Ormond Street, London, WC1N 3JH, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 2 JUN 2011
  2. Published Print: 17 JUN 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470973820

Online ISBN: 9781119993971

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • Eating disorder;
  • anorexia nervosa;
  • bulimia nervosa;
  • EDNOS;
  • child;
  • adolescent;
  • review

Summary

Eating disorders are serious mental illnesses in which abnormal eating behaviours, such as extreme dietary restriction, binge eating or self induced vomiting, are driven by overvalued ideas about weight and shape and pursuit of a thin ideal. Anorexia nervosa (AN) is distinguished from bulimia nervosa (BN) by the degree of weight loss in AN, and by the centrality of binge eating to BN. Over 60% of cases seen clinically are partial syndromes of clinical significance with high associated comorbidity. Aetiology is multifactorial, including individual, familial and cultural elements. The mainstay of treatment is comprehensive multi-disciplinary outpatient treatment, involving families, and based on a risk assessment and a formulation that includes developmental and systemic factors. New insights from neuroscience have implications for aetiology, prognosis and treatment.