1. Why Clinicians Should Love Neuroscience: the Clinical Relevance of Contemporary Knowledge

  1. Bryan Lask1,2,3 and
  2. Ian Frampton1,4
  1. David Wood

Published Online: 10 JUL 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781119998402.ch1

Eating Disorders and the Brain

Eating Disorders and the Brain

How to Cite

Wood, D. (2011) Why Clinicians Should Love Neuroscience: the Clinical Relevance of Contemporary Knowledge, in Eating Disorders and the Brain (eds B. Lask and I. Frampton), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119998402.ch1

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Regional Eating Disorders Service, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo Universitetssykehus HF, Ullevål, Bygg 37, 0407 Oslo, Norway

  2. 2

    Ellern Mede Service for Eating Disorders, 31 Totteridge Common, London, N20 8LR, UK

  3. 3

    Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London, WC1N 3JH, UK

  4. 4

    College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK

Author Information

  1. Ellern Mede Service for Eating Disorders, 31 Totteridge Common, London, N20 8LR, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 10 JUL 2011
  2. Published Print: 26 AUG 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470670033

Online ISBN: 9781119998402

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Keywords:

  • clinicians, and need for embracing neuroscience - clinical relevance of contemporary knowledge;
  • clinicians, uneasy relationship with neuroscience - tension, between these fields;
  • neuroscientific study, and neuroscientists absorbed - loosing sight of clinical relevance;
  • legacy of mind–body dualism - clinical work and neuroscience, a dualistic thinking;
  • dualist accounts, and emotion - alive in clinicians' unshakeable belief that AN, a ‘brain’ disease;
  • free will and determinism - human beings, choosing their destiny, a dualist position;
  • avoidance of energy intake, those suffering anorexia nervosa (AN) - drive, to expend energy;
  • aetiology, and apperception - new experience, transformed by past experience, a new whole;
  • neuroscience, framework - understanding aetiology of complex behavioural phenotypes;
  • self-regulation, or homeostasis - capacity of organisms, internal state within limits, for survival

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • The legacy of mind–body dualism

  • Free will and determinism

  • Clinical implications

  • Restriction of energy intake and increase in energy output

  • Non-eating-related concerns

  • In-the-beginning questions: the problem of aetiology in eating disorders

  • The temporal, ‘vertical’ aetiological dimension

  • The spatial, ‘horizontal’ aetiological dimension

  • The importance of a neuroscientific aetiological framework

  • Conclusion

  • References