7. Conceptual Models

  1. Bryan Lask2,3,4 and
  2. Ian Frampton2,5
  1. Mark Rose1,4 and
  2. Ian Frampton2,5

Published Online: 10 JUL 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781119998402.ch7

Eating Disorders and the Brain

Eating Disorders and the Brain

How to Cite

Rose, M. and Frampton, I. (2011) Conceptual Models, in Eating Disorders and the Brain (eds B. Lask and I. Frampton), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119998402.ch7

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Regional Eating Disorders Service, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo Universitetssykehus HF, Ullevål, Bygg 37, 0407 Oslo, Norway

  2. 3

    Ellern Mede Service for Eating Disorders, 31 Totteridge Common, London, N20 8LR, UK

  3. 4

    Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London, WC1N 3JH, UK

  4. 5

    College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    Huntercombe Group, UK

  2. 2

    Regional Eating Disorders Service, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo Universitetssykehus HF, Ullevål, Bygg 37, 0407 Oslo, Norway

  3. 4

    Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London, WC1N 3JH, UK

  4. 5

    College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 10 JUL 2011
  2. Published Print: 26 AUG 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470670033

Online ISBN: 9781119998402

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Keywords:

  • conceptual models, map of concepts and their relationships - key elements of the system;
  • conceptual models, on neuroscience of eating disorders - nature and origins of conceptual models;
  • Walker's suggestion that science - accurately predicts events in nature;
  • model, applicability and relevance - in the real world of practice;
  • conceptual models in anorexia nervosa - seven neuroscience-based conceptual models;
  • Model 1: a neurodevelopmental model for AN - pre- and perinatal factors, childhood stages of development;
  • evidence for impaired interpersonal skills - theory of mind, and impaired emotional regulation;
  • Model 2: model of aetiology of eating disorders - experimental neuroscience into clinical practice;
  • evidence for role of specific brain structures - in self-regulation, and the Stroop task;
  • all models for clinical practice, implications - lacking coherent understanding of the causes

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Conceptual models in anorexia nervosa

  • Conclusion

  • References