1. PTSD and Related Disorders

  1. Dan J. Stein MD, PhD1,2,
  2. Matthew J. Friedman MD3,4 and
  3. Carlos Blanco MD, PhD5
  1. Matthew J. Friedman MD3,4

Published Online: 15 JUL 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781119998471.ch1

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

How to Cite

Friedman, M. J. (2011) PTSD and Related Disorders, in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (eds D. J. Stein, M. J. Friedman and C. Blanco), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119998471.ch1

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Department of Psychiatry, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa

  2. 2

    Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA

  3. 3

    Department of Psychiatry and of Pharmacology & Toxicology, Dartmouth Medical School, USA

  4. 4

    National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, US Department of Veterans Affairs, Hanover, NH, USA

  5. 5

    Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA

Author Information

  1. 3

    Department of Psychiatry and of Pharmacology & Toxicology, Dartmouth Medical School, USA

  2. 4

    National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, US Department of Veterans Affairs, Hanover, NH, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 JUL 2011
  2. Published Print: 29 JUL 2011

Book Series:

  1. World Psychiatric Association Evidence and Experience in Psychiatry Series

Book Series Editors:

  1. Helen Herrman

Series Editor Information

  1. WPA Secretary for Publications, University of Melbourne, Australia

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470688977

Online ISBN: 9781119998471

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Keywords:

  • PTSD and related disorders, diagnoses - in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV-TR (DSMIV-TR);
  • PTSD, disorder of reactivity - than of altered baseline state, major depressive disorder;
  • safety of one's family, psychological models - classic Pavlovian fear conditioning, emotional processing theory;
  • fear-conditioning models - PTSD symptoms, intrusive recollections;
  • PTSD perspective, DSM-II, step backwards - from DSM-I, ill-defined as ‘gross stress reaction’;
  • Breslau and Kessler's test - implications of broad DSM-IV Criterion A1 versus DSM-III;
  • Criterion A2, imposition - people eligible for PTSD diagnosis, threatening event;
  • Kilpatrick et al., and key question of Criterion A - designed to maximising sensitivity;
  • Criterion D, four of five DSM-IV Criterion D symptoms - individuals with PTSD;
  • adjustment disorders (ADs) - addition to proposed DSM-5 category of Anxiety Disorders

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Historical Antecedents

  • PTSD: DSM-IV-TR Diagnostic Criteria

  • Acute Stress Disorder

  • Adjustment Disorders

  • Partial/Subsyndromal PTSD

  • Desnos/Complex PTSD

  • Subtypes of PTSD

  • Cross-Cultural Factors

  • Developmental Issues

  • Conclusion

  • References