3. The Development of Memory in Childhood

  1. Michael E. Lamb1,
  2. David J. La Rooy2,
  3. Lindsay C. Malloy3 and
  4. Carmit Katz1
  1. David J. La Rooy2,
  2. Lindsay C. Malloy3 and
  3. Michael E. Lamb1

Published Online: 6 JUN 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781119998495.ch3

Children's Testimony: A HANDBOOK OF PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH AND FORENSIC PRACTICE

Children's Testimony: A HANDBOOK OF PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH AND FORENSIC PRACTICE

How to Cite

La Rooy, D. J., Malloy, L. C. and Lamb, M. E. (2011) The Development of Memory in Childhood, in Children's Testimony: A HANDBOOK OF PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH AND FORENSIC PRACTICE (eds M. E. Lamb, D. J. La Rooy, L. C. Malloy and C. Katz), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781119998495.ch3

Editor Information

  1. 1

    University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom

  2. 2

    University of Abertay Dundee, Dundee, United Kingdom

  3. 3

    Florida International University, Florida, United States

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom

  2. 2

    University of Abertay Dundee, Dundee, United Kingdom

  3. 3

    Florida International University, Florida, United States

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 6 JUN 2011
  2. Published Print: 17 JUN 2011

Book Series:

  1. Wiley Series in The Psychology of Crime, Policing and Law

Book Series Editors:

  1. Graham Davies and
  2. Ray Bull

Series Editor Information

  1. University of Leicester, UK

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470686775

Online ISBN: 9781119998495

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Keywords:

  • memory development in childhood;
  • information, basic memory processes - best-practice guidelines;
  • ‘eyewitness memory’, ‘event memory’ - and ‘autobiographical memory’ and ‘episodicmemory’;
  • research on other kinds of memory - and memory processes;
  • development of memory;
  • implications of findings - for interviewers;
  • older children's memory - measured directly;
  • memory changes over time – or reminiscence;
  • reconstructive nature of memory and suggestibility;
  • two ways of remembering - free recall versus recognition

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • The Development of Memory

  • Memory Changes over Time

  • The Reconstructive Nature of Memory and Suggestibility

  • Two Important Ways we Remember: Free Recall Versus Recognition

  • Context Reinstatement and the Theory of ‘Encoding Specificity’

  • Stress, Trauma and Memory

  • Conclusions

  • References