Chapter 13. The Importance of Reproductive Dynamics in Fish Stock Assessments

  1. Andy Payne,
  2. John Cotter and
  3. Ted Potter
  1. Peter R. Witthames2 and
  2. C. Tara Marshall1

Published Online: 9 FEB 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444302653.ch13

Advances in Fisheries Science: 50 years on from Beverton and Holt

Advances in Fisheries Science: 50 years on from Beverton and Holt

How to Cite

Witthames, P. R. and Marshall, C. T. (2008) The Importance of Reproductive Dynamics in Fish Stock Assessments, in Advances in Fisheries Science: 50 years on from Beverton and Holt (eds A. Payne, J. Cotter and T. Potter), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444302653.ch13

Editor Information

  1. Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, Suffolk, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Aberdeen, School of Biological Sciences, Tillydrone Avenue, Aberdeen, AB24 2TZ, UK

  2. 2

    Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, Suffolk, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 9 FEB 2009
  2. Published Print: 17 APR 2008

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405170833

Online ISBN: 9781444302653

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Keywords:

  • reproductive dynamics and their importance in fish stock assessments;
  • fishery effects on population structure;
  • fisheries influencing ecosystem and genetic make-up of exploited species;
  • maternal effects related to age;
  • paternal effects related to age;
  • interaction between genotype and environment;
  • fishery-independent methods;
  • stock–recruitment relationship

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Fishery Effects on Population Structure

  • Fisheries Influence the Productivity of an Ecosystem and the Genetic Make-Up of Exploited Species

  • Maternal Effects Related to Age

  • Paternal Effects Related to Age

  • Interaction between the Genotype and the Environment

  • Utilizing Information on Reproductive Potential to Produce Better Forecasts

  • Fishery-Independent Methods

  • CONCLUSIONS

  • REFERENCES