Chapter 8. The Importance of Kinship in Monkey Society

  1. Nicholas J. Allen Reader2,
  2. Hilary Callan Director3,
  3. Robin Dunbar Professor Director4 and
  4. Wendy James Professor Emeritus Fellow committed social anthropologist5
  1. Amanda H. Korstjens Ph.D. Senior Lecturer

Published Online: 30 MAR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444302714.ch8

Early Human Kinship: From Sex to Social Reproduction

Early Human Kinship: From Sex to Social Reproduction

How to Cite

Korstjens, A. H. (2008) The Importance of Kinship in Monkey Society, in Early Human Kinship: From Sex to Social Reproduction (eds N. J. Allen, H. Callan, R. Dunbar and W. James), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444302714.ch8

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Oxford, UK

  2. 3

    Royal Anthropological Institute, Great Britain

  3. 4

    University of Oxford, UK

  4. 5

    St Cross College, Oxford, UK

Author Information

  1. Bournemouth University, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 MAR 2009
  2. Published Print: 6 JUN 2008

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405179010

Online ISBN: 9781444302714

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Keywords:

  • role of kinship in primate societies;
  • genetic success of individual - measured by individual's own survival and reproduction;
  • cooperation in predator defence;
  • cooperation in intra-group competition;
  • primate females - likely to cooperate when contest competition over food is strong;
  • cooperation in raising offspring;
  • inbreeding - breeding between close relatives avoided in primates;
  • kin recognition;
  • biological kinship running like a red thread through social organization of primates

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Kinship and Cooperation

  • Inbreeding Avoidance

  • Kin Recognition

  • Conclusion