Chapter 2. Extreme Harmdoing: A View from the Social Psychology of Justice

  1. Dr Victoria M. Esses Professor Director Fellow and
  2. Richard A. Vernon Professor
  1. Carolyn L. Hafer PhD Professor faculty member1,
  2. James M. Olson Professor Associate Professor3 and
  3. Dr Alexandra A. Peterson BA(Hons), MA Juris Doctor2

Published Online: 23 FEB 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444303056.ch2

Explaining the Breakdown of Ethnic Relations: Why Neighbors Kill

Explaining the Breakdown of Ethnic Relations: Why Neighbors Kill

How to Cite

Hafer, C. L., Olson, J. M. and Peterson, A. A. (2008) Extreme Harmdoing: A View from the Social Psychology of Justice, in Explaining the Breakdown of Ethnic Relations: Why Neighbors Kill (eds V. M. Esses and R. A. Vernon), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444303056.ch2

Editor Information

  1. University of Western Ontario, Canada

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Psychology, Brock University in St. Catharines, Canada

  2. 2

    University of Toronto Faculty of Law, Canada

  3. 3

    University of Western Ontario, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 23 FEB 2009
  2. Published Print: 11 JUL 2008

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405170581

Online ISBN: 9781444303056

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Keywords:

  • extreme harmdoing and social psychology of justice;
  • social psychology of justice - psychological branch and sociological branch;
  • social psychological approach in understanding role of justice in extreme harmdoing;
  • justice perceived as irrelevant;
  • justice motive relatively weak in comparison;
  • individual difference variables influencing justice motive;
  • extreme harmdoing in the name of justice;
  • theories and research in social justice literature and shedding light on extreme harmdoing;
  • possible roles of justice in extreme harmdoing

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • The Social Psychology of Justice

  • Justice is Perceived as Irrelevant

  • The Justice Motive is Relatively Weak in Comparison to Other Motives

  • Extreme Harmdoing in the Name of Justice

  • Summary and Implications

  • References