Rhythmic Seasonal Layering in a Mesotidal Channel Fill Sequence, Oosterschelde Mouth, the Netherlands

  1. S.-D. Nio,
  2. R. T. E. Shüttenhelm and
  3. Tj. C. E. Van Weering
  1. Jan H. Van Den Berg

Published Online: 29 JUN 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444303759.ch11

Holocene Marine Sedimentation in the North Sea Basin

Holocene Marine Sedimentation in the North Sea Basin

How to Cite

Van Den Berg, J. H. (1981) Rhythmic Seasonal Layering in a Mesotidal Channel Fill Sequence, Oosterschelde Mouth, the Netherlands, in Holocene Marine Sedimentation in the North Sea Basin (eds S.-D. Nio, R. T. E. Shüttenhelm and Tj. C. E. Van Weering), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444303759.ch11

Author Information

  1. Comparative Sedimentology Division, Institute of Earth Sciences, Budapestlaan 4, 3508 TA Utrecht, the Netherlands

  1. Rijkswaterstaat, Deltadienst, Van Veenlaan 1, Zierikzee, the Netherlands

  1. Comparative Sedimentology Division, Report No. 52.

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 29 JUN 2009
  2. Published Print: 23 DEC 1981

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780632008582

Online ISBN: 9781444303759

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Keywords:

  • different degrees of bioturbation;
  • a mesotidal channel fill sequence;
  • correlation of rhythmic beds between two outcrops;
  • dense horizons of Spisula and Cerastoderma;
  • accretional patterns caused by channel migration

Summary

Sedimentary features of a subrecent channel fill sequence produced during abandonment of a 12 m deep tidal channel are described. The history of channel abandonment and subsequent infill is documented by detailed hydrographic charts. The sequence contains a 5 m thick layer composed of a rhythmic alternation of two facies. Evidence for a seasonal origin of this rhythmic bedding is provided by: the relationship between the thickness of individual couplets of winter and summer layers, and the annual rate of accumulation as interpreted from hydrographic charts; the growth and mortality pattern of some frequently occurring bivalve species (Macoma balthica, Cerastoderma edule, Abra alba, Spisula subtruncata); the different degrees of bioturbation between the two members of each couplet; the occasionally perceptible increase in diameter of internal traces (press structures) of the heart urchin (Echinocardium cordatum) in upward direction. Inorganic primary sedimentary structures point to remarkable low-energy conditions during deposition of the rhythmic beds. The summer facies consist of interlaminated mud, silt and fine sands. The winter layers are composed of flaser bedding. The transition from summer to following winter layer is slightly erosional, whereas a more gradual transition occurs from winter to summer layers. The thickness of individual winter–summer couplets ranges between 20 and 60 cm. Individual couplets may continue for hundreds of metres, especially in sections parallel to the axis of the channel.