Facies Sequences Associated with Some Braided River Deposits of Late Pleistocene Age from Southern Britain

  1. J. D. Collinson and
  2. J. Lewin
  1. Ian D. Bryant

Published Online: 29 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444303773.ch21

Modern and Ancient Fluvial Systems

Modern and Ancient Fluvial Systems

How to Cite

Bryant, I. D. (1983) Facies Sequences Associated with Some Braided River Deposits of Late Pleistocene Age from Southern Britain, in Modern and Ancient Fluvial Systems (eds J. D. Collinson and J. Lewin), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444303773.ch21

Author Information

  1. Department of Geography, University of Reading, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 29 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 7 FEB 1983

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780632009978

Online ISBN: 9781444303773

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Keywords:

  • facies sequences associated with braided river deposits of late Pleistocene age from Southern Britain;
  • Linch hill, Oxfordshire;
  • Tattershall Thorpe, Lincolnshire;
  • facies GM of Linch Hill;
  • Tattershall Thorpe quarry

Summary

Fluvial successions of Devensian age are described from exposures within river terraces of drainage basins south of the glacial ice limit. Examples are presented from the Bain Valley of Lincolnshire and the Thames Valley. Reconstructions using sedimentological, geomorphological and biostratigraphical evidence indicate that deposition occurred in a permafrost environment.

Primary sedimentary structures indicate deposition by rivers of the Scott–and possibly Donjek–type of Miall (1977). The sequence of facies changes suggest a near-continuous aggradation of the sediments with periodic exposure to sub-aerial conditions. During exposure ice wedges developed within the sediments. Subsequent channel migration appears to have been associated with talik extension (permafrost degradation) leading to the decay of the ice wedge ice and subsequent casting. The resultant planar erosion surfaces which truncate ice wedge casts are taken as evidence for the former existence of higher topographic levels of floodplain sediments during the aggradation of the sediment body. These surfaces truncate complete fluvial cycles with a resultant preferential preservation of bar platform sediments.