The Okefenokee Swamp: A Low Sulphur End-Member of a Shoreline-Related Depositional Model for Coastal Plain Coals

  1. R. A. Rahmani and
  2. R. M. Flores
  1. Arthur D. Cohen

Published Online: 28 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444303797.ch13

Sedimentology of Coal and Coal-Bearing Sequences

Sedimentology of Coal and Coal-Bearing Sequences

How to Cite

Cohen, A. D. (1985) The Okefenokee Swamp: A Low Sulphur End-Member of a Shoreline-Related Depositional Model for Coastal Plain Coals, in Sedimentology of Coal and Coal-Bearing Sequences (eds R. A. Rahmani and R. M. Flores), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444303797.ch13

Author Information

  1. Department of Geology, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA

  1. MS D462, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA

  1. Reprinted from C.r. Congrès 9th int. Stratigraphie et de Géologie du Carbonifère, vol. 4.

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 26 MAR 1985

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780632012862

Online ISBN: 9781444303797

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Keywords:

  • Oakfenokee swamp – a low sulphur end-member of a shoreline-related depositional model for coastal plain coals;
  • petrographic and palaeobotanic characteristics;
  • peat deposition;
  • Okefenokee peats;
  • Snuggedy swamp

Summary

The Okefenokee Swamp is proposed as one end-member of a shoreline-related model for coal deposition. Its peat would produce a coal seam that is relatively thick and continuous, with gaps occurring only where shoreline features are high. The seam would also tend to thicken along troughs roughly parallel to the orientation of the remnant shoreline features. The ash and sulphur contents of this coal would be low and ‘inorganic splits’ in the seam would be rare. Thicker portions of the coal seam would tend to be massive (non-banded); whereas, thinner portions of the seam would consist of alternating bright and dull bands with greater amounts of fusinite, selerotinite, and corpocollinite. The other types of barrier-shoreline coal seams (the Snuggedy Swamp type and the salt marsh type) would be expected to display certain geometric and compositional similarities to the Okefenokee seam but would also display certain predictable differences in composition from it.