Origin of Iron Carbonate Layers in Tertiary Coastal Sediments of Central Kalimantan Province (Borneo), Indonesia

  1. John Parnell,
  2. Ye Lianjun and
  3. Chen Changming
  1. G. R. Sieffermann

Published Online: 3 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444303872.ch11

Sediment-Hosted Mineral Deposits: Proceedings of a Symposium Held in Beijing, People's Republic of China, 30 July-4 August 1988

Sediment-Hosted Mineral Deposits: Proceedings of a Symposium Held in Beijing, People's Republic of China, 30 July-4 August 1988

How to Cite

Sieffermann, G. R. (2009) Origin of Iron Carbonate Layers in Tertiary Coastal Sediments of Central Kalimantan Province (Borneo), Indonesia, in Sediment-Hosted Mineral Deposits: Proceedings of a Symposium Held in Beijing, People's Republic of China, 30 July-4 August 1988 (eds J. Parnell, Y. Lianjun and C. Changming), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444303872.ch11

Editor Information

  1. Department of Geology, The Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 INN, UK

Author Information

  1. ORSTOM-UGM Cooperation, Sekip K 3, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 27 SEP 1990

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780632028818

Online ISBN: 9781444303872

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Keywords:

  • brackish water sedimentation;
  • siderite, showing pale yellowish-grey colour which changes gradually;
  • giant podzols;
  • Central Kalimantan Province, inheriting detrital components;
  • iron carbonate sedimentation

Summary

Siderite layers, brown coals and quartzitic sands are an important part of the Tertiary section of the Rungan River Basin in Central Kalimantan Province, Indonesia. The siderite layers consist of grey, fine-grained, indurated rocks.

The depositional setting in Borneo during the Upper Tertiary was that of a large coastal lowland area with peat swamps and tropical giant podzols, much like the modern landscape. This environment seems to have been favourable for the formation of siderite. A relationship can be suggested between iron carbonate sedimentation and deferrification of onshore sedimentary continental formations through a pedological podzolization process. The iron was probably removed from the soils by ‘black’ waters which were rich in iron-complexing organic compounds. The iron carbonate was probably formed in tidal lagoons, in a brackish environment under reducing conditions.

The depositional setting shows that the origin of the iron in siderite layers must be sought laterally, probably hundreds of kilometres away, in bleached siliceous formations, associated with coal beds which are the former peat deposits. This mode of occurrence may have application to other sequences where such distinct lateral relationships are less obvious.