Metal Enrichments in Organic Materials as a Guide to Ore Mineralization

  1. John Parnell,
  2. Ye Lianjun and
  3. Chen Changming
  1. J. Parnell

Published Online: 3 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444303872.ch15

Sediment-Hosted Mineral Deposits: Proceedings of a Symposium Held in Beijing, People's Republic of China, 30 July-4 August 1988

Sediment-Hosted Mineral Deposits: Proceedings of a Symposium Held in Beijing, People's Republic of China, 30 July-4 August 1988

How to Cite

Parnell, J. (2009) Metal Enrichments in Organic Materials as a Guide to Ore Mineralization, in Sediment-Hosted Mineral Deposits: Proceedings of a Symposium Held in Beijing, People's Republic of China, 30 July-4 August 1988 (eds J. Parnell, Y. Lianjun and C. Changming), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444303872.ch15

Editor Information

  1. Department of Geology, The Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 INN, UK

Author Information

  1. Department of Geology, The Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 INN, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 27 SEP 1990

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780632028818

Online ISBN: 9781444303872

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • uraniferous hydrocarbon nodules in Permian red beds;
  • organic-rich and organic-poor sediment, containing redox boundaries;
  • Devonian Orcadian Basin;
  • organic-rich nodules in Devonian red beds;
  • Minas Ragra bitumen - sulphur-rich variety;
  • syngenetic organic material

Summary

The determination of metal enrichments in organic materials can contribute to the geochemical exploration for metalliferous ore deposits. An enrichment in metals can develop at several stages in the geological evolution of organic matter, from living tissue through kerogen and liquid hydrocarbons to solid hydrocarbon products. Scenarios for enrichment include: (1) uptake by organic matter from groundwaters flowing through ore deposits; (2) organic matter caught up in metal-rich hydrothermal systems; and (3) organic matter with a signature of low-level synsedimentary metal concentrations which were subsequently remobilized into ore deposits. Some solid bitumens are so enriched in metal that they constitute the actual ore body. Uranium is especially found enriched within organic materials, including bitumens which precipitate around uranium minerals due to radiation-induced polymerization, but many other metals also form enrichments.