Manganese Deposits of the Proterozoic Datangpo Formation, South China: Genesis and Palaeogeography

  1. John Parnell,
  2. Ye Lianjun and
  3. Chen Changming
  1. X. Xu,
  2. H. Huang and
  3. B. Liu

Published Online: 3 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444303872.ch4

Sediment-Hosted Mineral Deposits: Proceedings of a Symposium Held in Beijing, People's Republic of China, 30 July-4 August 1988

Sediment-Hosted Mineral Deposits: Proceedings of a Symposium Held in Beijing, People's Republic of China, 30 July-4 August 1988

How to Cite

Xu, X., Huang, H. and Liu, B. (1990) Manganese Deposits of the Proterozoic Datangpo Formation, South China: Genesis and Palaeogeography, in Sediment-Hosted Mineral Deposits: Proceedings of a Symposium Held in Beijing, People's Republic of China, 30 July-4 August 1988 (eds J. Parnell, Y. Lianjun and C. Changming), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444303872.ch4

Editor Information

  1. Department of Geology, The Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 INN, UK

Author Information

  1. Chengdu Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources, Renmin bei lu, Chengdu, Sichuan, China

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 27 SEP 1990

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780632028818

Online ISBN: 9781444303872

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Keywords:

  • ABC and ABE Bouma sequences;
  • manganese ore bodies, including lens and pillow-shaped structures;
  • Datangpo Formation;
  • Lower Sinian succession, showing sharp lateral variation;
  • lenticular-ore facies;
  • Rhodochrosite, exhibiting micronodular colloidal precipitation texture

Summary

The early Sinian (late Proterozoic) black manganese carbonate deposits of the Datangpo Formation are distributed in eastern Guizhou and western Hunan provinces. The formation comprises a belt extending for over 600 km along depositional strike and 150 km perpendicular to strike. The manganese deposits are located in a rift belt on the margin of the Yangtze Craton.

The Datangpo Formation is interbedded between two sequences that have been interpreted as glacial diamictites. The formation comprises manganese ore and manganese-rich shale which show fine, graded laminae, with ABC and ABE Bouma sequences. The manganese-rich shale contains algae, fungi and acritarchs as well as radiolaria which are reported for the first time. These features suggest that the manganese deposits were deposited in relatively deep water which could have resulted from deglaciation and an associated sea-level rise.

The manganese ore bodies include lens and pillow-shaped structures with a concentric internal fabric, and are cut by fine barite and quartz veinlets.

It is suggested that the manganese originated from hydrothermal exhalation at the seafloor. It was precipitated as successive concentric layers around a nucleus, building up a pillow-shaped body. It is suggested that the glacial melting at the beginning of Datangpo Formation times brought about a major sea-level rise and the resulting transgression established a relatively deep marine environment. Hydrothermal exhalation at the sea bottom could have resulted in a stratification of the water column with an anoxic bottom layer in which the syngenetic manganese deposits were precipitated.