Neogene Interaction of Tectonic and Glacial Processes at the Pacific Margin of the Antarctic Peninsula

  1. David I. M. Macdonald
  1. R. D. Larter and
  2. P. F. Barker

Published Online: 14 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444303896.ch10

Sedimentation, Tectonics and Eustasy: Sea-Level Changes at Active Margins

Sedimentation, Tectonics and Eustasy: Sea-Level Changes at Active Margins

How to Cite

Larter, R. D. and Barker, P. F. (1991) Neogene Interaction of Tectonic and Glacial Processes at the Pacific Margin of the Antarctic Peninsula, in Sedimentation, Tectonics and Eustasy: Sea-Level Changes at Active Margins (ed D. I. M. Macdonald), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444303896.ch10

Editor Information

  1. British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK

Author Information

  1. British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ET, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 14 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 13 JUN 1991

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780632030170

Online ISBN: 9781444303896

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Keywords:

  • neogene interaction of tectonic and glacial processes at Pacific margin of Antarctic Peninsula;
  • magnetic anomaly identifications in southeast Pacific;
  • ridge-crest—trench collisions;
  • antarctic continental margins;
  • age and extent of antarctic peninsula ridge-crest-trench collisions;
  • seismic reflection profiles;
  • Pliocene—Pleistocene shelf and slope sequences;
  • sequence stratigraphy - global sea-level fluctuations on continental margins

Summary

The Antarctic Peninsula was a magmatic arc subducting Pacific Ocean floor throughout the Mesozoic. During the Cenozoic, subduction ceased at each of a series of ridge-crest–trench collisions, which migrated northeast along the margin. Multichannel seismic profiles across the Pacific margin of the Antarctic Peninsula show evidence of post-collision uplift, followed by subsidence. During Pliocene–Pleistocene time, ice sheets have grounded out to the shelf edge at times of glacial maximum, transporting sediment that has extended the outer shelf. Subsidence of the margin has preserved a unique sedimentary record of ice-sheet advances, which provides the opportunity of looking closely at the hypothesized relationship between change in grounded ice volume and global sea-level change.