Depositional Sequences Associated with Equilibrium Coastlines in the Neogene of South-Western Nicaragua

  1. David I. M. Macdonald
  1. Wolfgang Kolb and
  2. Hannelore Schmidt

Published Online: 14 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444303896.ch15

Sedimentation, Tectonics and Eustasy: Sea-Level Changes at Active Margins

Sedimentation, Tectonics and Eustasy: Sea-Level Changes at Active Margins

How to Cite

Kolb, W. and Schmidt, H. (1991) Depositional Sequences Associated with Equilibrium Coastlines in the Neogene of South-Western Nicaragua, in Sedimentation, Tectonics and Eustasy: Sea-Level Changes at Active Margins (ed D. I. M. Macdonald), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444303896.ch15

Editor Information

  1. British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK

Author Information

  1. Institut für Geologie und Paläontologie, Universität Stuttgart, Böblinger Strasse 72, D 7000 Stuttgart 1, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 14 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 13 JUN 1991

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780632030170

Online ISBN: 9781444303896

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • depositional sequences associated with equilibrium coastlines in Neogene of southwestern Nicaragua;
  • facies relationships - coastal plain deposits;
  • fan-delta and braid-delta deposits;
  • Playa Hermosa section - starting with coastal plain deposits;
  • sequence-stratigraphic interpretation and correlation;
  • highstand systems tract;
  • El Fraile Formation - reflecting shallow-marine history of Nicaraguan section of Central American fore-arc area during Miocene to early Pliocene

Summary

The Neogene shallow-marine ‘El Fraile’ basin in southwestern Nicaragua reveals three depositional sequences, each comprising shallow-shelf to shoreface deposits. In places, coarse clastic fan-delta complexes occur owing to local tectonic uplift combined with volcanic activity. The depositional sequences are the product of a complex interaction between eustatic sea-level fluctuation and tectonic activity. Systems tracts and their internal facies association, however, are mainly controlled by local parameters: local sediment supply, subsidence/uplift, and relative sea-level changes.