Response of Deep-Water Fore-Arc Systems to Sea-Level Changes, Tectonic Activity and Volcaniclastic Input in Central America

  1. David I. M. Macdonald
  1. Jutta Winsemann and
  2. Hartmut Seyfried

Published Online: 14 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444303896.ch16

Sedimentation, Tectonics and Eustasy: Sea-Level Changes at Active Margins

Sedimentation, Tectonics and Eustasy: Sea-Level Changes at Active Margins

How to Cite

Winsemann, J. and Seyfried, H. (1991) Response of Deep-Water Fore-Arc Systems to Sea-Level Changes, Tectonic Activity and Volcaniclastic Input in Central America, in Sedimentation, Tectonics and Eustasy: Sea-Level Changes at Active Margins (ed D. I. M. Macdonald), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444303896.ch16

Editor Information

  1. British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK

Author Information

  1. Institut für Geologie und Paläontologie, Universität Stuttgart, Böblinger Strasse 72, D-7000 Stuttgart 1, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 14 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 13 JUN 1991

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780632030170

Online ISBN: 9781444303896

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Keywords:

  • response of deep-water fore-arc systems to sea-level changes, tectonic activity and volcaniclastic input in Central America;
  • depositional sequences in inner fore-arc troughs;
  • deposits of Nicaragua Trough - exposed along Pacific coast;
  • deposits of Tempisque Trough - recorded from Barbudal;
  • depositional sequences in trench slope basins;
  • tectonic uplift/subsidence, volcanic supply, and eustatic fluctuations on deposition;
  • late Cretaceous to late Eocene drift rates - global orogenic phases with crustal movements in central America

Summary

The incipient island-arc system of southern Central America (Cretaceous–early Oligocene) is characterized by thick turbidite systems, which mainly filled inner fore-arc troughs. Outcrop data show four, second-order depositional sequences in the deep-water sediments. The formation of these depositional sequences is strongly related to the morphotectonic evolution of the island-arc system. Each depositional sequence reflects the complex interaction between global sea-level fluctuations, sediment supply, and tectonic activity.

Strong marginal uplift and high volcaniclastic sediment supply during early to late Paleocene and late Eocene times caused the formation of coarse-grained channel-lobe systems. During late Paleocene and mid-Eocene times, fine-grained, thin-bedded turbidite systems were deposited, owing to regional subsidence and a decrease in volcanic supply. Uplift and subsidence of sediment-source areas acted as major controls on deposition of basinal cycles.