High-Level Marine Terraces in Western and Southern New Zealand: Indicators of the Tectonic Tempo of an Active Continental Margin

  1. David I. M. Macdonald
  1. D. G. Bishop

Published Online: 14 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444303896.ch3

Sedimentation, Tectonics and Eustasy: Sea-Level Changes at Active Margins

Sedimentation, Tectonics and Eustasy: Sea-Level Changes at Active Margins

How to Cite

Bishop, D. G. (1991) High-Level Marine Terraces in Western and Southern New Zealand: Indicators of the Tectonic Tempo of an Active Continental Margin, in Sedimentation, Tectonics and Eustasy: Sea-Level Changes at Active Margins (ed D. I. M. Macdonald), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444303896.ch3

Editor Information

  1. British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK

Author Information

  1. New Zealand Geological Survey, Dept. of Scientific and Industrial Research, Private Bag, Dunedin, New Zealand

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 14 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 13 JUN 1991

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780632030170

Online ISBN: 9781444303896

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Keywords:

  • rates, magnitudes and processes of sea-level change;
  • high-level marine terraces in western and southern New Zealand - tectonic tempo of active continental margin;
  • New Zealand terraces;
  • Waitutu district;
  • Fiordland and Waitutu uplift rates;
  • nomenclature for raised marine terraces

Summary

The techniques and results of recent studies of flights of high-level marine terraces, some extending to 1700 m above sea level, are described and discussed. A numerical correlation model relating terrace levels in New Zealand to the ‘type’ sequence in New Guinea gives results consistent with those derived from morphostratigraphic correlation with a partly dated New Zealand sequence. Both methods yield uplift rates of c. 3–8 mm/yr, in line with those determined by independent methods, and indicate an increased rate along the Alpine Fault, perhaps resulting from a change in relative motion between the Indo–Australian and Pacific plates, from about 135 000–140 000 years ago.

Greater attention to morphostratigraphy could enable a more satisfactory resolution of conflicting interpretations and allow more convincing correlations to be made.