Interplay between Arc Tectonics and Sea-Level Changes as Revealed by Sedimentation Patterns in the Aleutians

  1. David I. M. Macdonald
  1. Maxwell R. Dobson1,
  2. David W. Scholl2 and
  3. Andrew J. Stevenson2

Published Online: 14 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444303896.ch9

Sedimentation, Tectonics and Eustasy: Sea-Level Changes at Active Margins

Sedimentation, Tectonics and Eustasy: Sea-Level Changes at Active Margins

How to Cite

Dobson, M. R., Scholl, D. W. and Stevenson, A. J. (1991) Interplay between Arc Tectonics and Sea-Level Changes as Revealed by Sedimentation Patterns in the Aleutians, in Sedimentation, Tectonics and Eustasy: Sea-Level Changes at Active Margins (ed D. I. M. Macdonald), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444303896.ch9

Editor Information

  1. British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    Institute of Earth Studies, University College of Wales, Aberystwyth, UK

  2. 2

    US Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 14 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 13 JUN 1991

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780632030170

Online ISBN: 9781444303896

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Keywords:

  • interplay between arc tectonics and sea-level changes – as revealed by sedimentation patterns in Aleutians;
  • evolution of the arc;
  • erosion transportation and sedimentation patterns;
  • lower series (pre-Oligocene);
  • upper series (Pliocene to present);
  • trench and pacific plate sediments;
  • middle series (Oligocene—Miocene);
  • arc evolution in relation to vertical motion and sea-level changes

Summary

Intra-oceanic convergent margin evolution is broadly related to the thermal character of the subducting plate such that it is considered the principal control both in terms of volcanic arc expansion and subsequent decline. Patterns of arc sedimentation are similarly influenced by the subducting plate although sea-level oscillations, with their impact on arc erosion, transportation, and deposition of sediment, are of comparable importance. In the dynamic environment of a volcanic arc, being able to recognize eustatic signals depends on the availability of thick, well-preserved sedimentary sequences. Aleutian arc-flanking sediment sequences, seen as the Lower and Middle Series, provide only facies indications for sea-level changes, as they accumulated during a phase of arc expansion and rapid uplift, whilst the Upper Series, having largely been deposited in fore-arc basins during a period of arc subsidence, has the potential to retain detailed evidence. GLORIA images, for the Aleutian Terrace, reveal the styles of Upper Series sedimentation and intimate that glacio-eustatic activity has been the principal control.