Sequence Stratigraphy of the Onshore Palaeogene, Southeastern Atlantic Coastal Plain, USA

  1. Henry W. Posamentier2,
  2. Colin P. Summerhayes3,
  3. Bilal U. Haq4 and
  4. George P. Allen5
  1. W. B. Harris,
  2. V. A. Zullo and
  3. R. A. Laws

Published Online: 15 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444304015.ch27

Sequence Stratigraphy and Facies Associations

Sequence Stratigraphy and Facies Associations

How to Cite

Harris, W. B., Zullo, V. A. and Laws, R. A. (2009) Sequence Stratigraphy of the Onshore Palaeogene, Southeastern Atlantic Coastal Plain, USA, in Sequence Stratigraphy and Facies Associations (eds H. W. Posamentier, C. P. Summerhayes, B. U. Haq and G. P. Allen), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444304015.ch27

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Plano, Texas, USA

  2. 3

    Godalming, UK

  3. 4

    Washington, DC, USA

  4. 5

    St Remy les Chevreuses, France

Author Information

  1. Department of Earth Sciences, University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, North Carolina 28403, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 17 NOV 1993

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780632035489

Online ISBN: 9781444304015

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Keywords:

  • sequence stratigraphy of onshore Palaeogene, southeastern Atlantic Coastal Plain, USA;
  • depositional sequences and Albemarle embayment;
  • Albemarle embayment to Savannah River area of Southeast Georgia embayment;
  • biostratigraphy, and sequence stratigraphy of Eocene sediments in Albemarle embayment and Cape Fear arch of North Carolina;
  • stratigraphic revisions of outcropping North Carolina Coastal Plain units;
  • depositional sequences - Santee River area;
  • depositional sequences - Savannah River area;
  • sequence-stratigraphic analysis - interpreting Palaeogene sediments in Albemarle embayment of North Carolina

Summary

Application of sequence-stratigraphic concepts to basin margin sediments in the Albemarle embayment and Cape Fear arch areas of North Carolina, and the Santee and Savannah River areas of the Southeast Georgia embayment of South Carolina allows recognition of Palaeogene depositional sequences. Through their contained micro- and megafossils the sequences are correlated with standard biostratigraphic zonations and global cycles of coastal onlap. The Albemarle and Southeast Georgia embayments contain two Palaeocene siliciclastic depositional sequences (Danian and Thanetian) separated by the global 58.5 Ma type 1 unconformity. The Danian sequence correlates to the TA1.3 cycle in the Albemarle embayment and the Savannah River area and the TA1.2 cycle in the Santee River area. The Thanetian sequence correlates to the TA2.1 cycle in the Albemarle and Southeast Georgia embayments. The Albemarle embayment and the Santee and Savannah River areas preserve several early, middle and late Eocene depositional sequences. Siliciclastic and carbonate Ypresian sequence(s) are separated from the Lutetian–Priabonian sequences by the global 49.5 Ma unconformity. They are correlated to one cycle between the TA2.4 and TA2.9 cycles in the Albemarle embayment, the TA2.5 cycle in the Santee River area and the TA2.4 and TA2.5 cycles in the Savannah River area. The Lutetian–Priabonian sequences are carbonate in the Albemarle embayment, siliciclastic and carbonate in the Santee River area and predominantly siliciclastic in the Savannah River area. They are correlated to the TA3.3 through TA4.3 cycles in the Albemarle embayment and the Santee River area and the TA3.2 through TA4.3 cycles in the Savannah River area.

One Rupelian and four Chattian siliciclastic and carbonate depositional sequences are recognized in the Albemarle embayment and two Chattian sequences in the Santee River area. Erosion during the major Oligocene sea-level fall at 30 Ma is probably responsible for the absence of early Oligocene sequences in the onshore Southeast Georgia embayment. In the Albemarle embayment they are correlated to the TA4.4 through TB1.4 cycles, and in the Santee River area to the TB1.1 cycle and either the TB1.2 or TB1.3 cycle. Although Oligocene sediments are reported in the Savannah River area, we have not recognized them.