High-Frequency, Glacial–Eustatic Sequences in Early Namurian Coal-Bearing Fluviodeltaic Deposits, Central Scotland

  1. P. L. de Boer2 and
  2. D. G. Smith3
  1. W. A. Read

Published Online: 29 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444304039.ch25

Orbital Forcing and Cyclic Sequences

Orbital Forcing and Cyclic Sequences

How to Cite

Read, W. A. (1994) High-Frequency, Glacial–Eustatic Sequences in Early Namurian Coal-Bearing Fluviodeltaic Deposits, Central Scotland, in Orbital Forcing and Cyclic Sequences (eds P. L. de Boer and D. G. Smith), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444304039.ch25

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Utrecht, The Netherlands

  2. 3

    London, UK

Author Information

  1. Department of Geology, University of Keele, Keele, Staffordshire ST5 5BG, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 29 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 28 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780632037360

Online ISBN: 9781444304039

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Keywords:

  • glacial-eustatic sequences - Namurian coal-bearing fluviodeltaic deposits, central Scotland;
  • carboniferous cyclical sedimentation;
  • sequence stratigraphy;
  • Orbitally forced cyclicity;
  • fluviodeltaic facies associations;
  • namurian sequence stratigraphy

Summary

Sedimentation in the upper part of the Pendleian Limestone Coal Group within the Kilsyth Trough and Kincardine Basin, situated in the northern part of the Midland Valley of Scotland, was influenced by a variety of superimposed controls. These included tectonic uplift of the Highland source area and local autocyclic sedimentary processes, as well as widespread, probably eustatic, sea-level oscillations with two or more periodicities. ‘Long’ allocycles produced major marine transgressions, at intervals of probably somewhat less than 1 Ma. Between major transgressions, fluviodeltaic sedimentation was generally controlled by high-frequency, probably glacial–eustatic, ‘short’ allocycles, with a periodicity within the lower range of Milankovitch orbital parameters. These produced a remarkably uniform, ‘layer-cake’ succession in distal environments relatively remote from strong fluvial influences.

In the ‘short’ allocycles the rate of eustatic fall outpaced tectonic subsidence so that, in terms of the Exxon Production Research Company's concepts of sequence stratigraphy, they represent high-frequency type 1 sequences, which can be divided into high-stand, low-stand and transgressive systems tracts. Glacial low-stands are usually represented only by incised fluvial channels and the whole succession is high-stand dominated.