Internal Response to Orbital Forcing and External Cyclic Sedimentary Sequences

  1. P. L. de Boer2 and
  2. D. G. Smith3
  1. N.-A. Mörner

Published Online: 29 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444304039.ch3

Orbital Forcing and Cyclic Sequences

Orbital Forcing and Cyclic Sequences

How to Cite

Mörner, N.-A. (1994) Internal Response to Orbital Forcing and External Cyclic Sedimentary Sequences, in Orbital Forcing and Cyclic Sequences (eds P. L. de Boer and D. G. Smith), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444304039.ch3

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Utrecht, The Netherlands

  2. 3

    London, UK

Author Information

  1. Department of Paleogeophysics & Geodynamics, University of Stockholm, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 29 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 28 JAN 1994

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780632037360

Online ISBN: 9781444304039

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Keywords:

  • internal response to orbital forcing and external sedimentary sequences;
  • changes in pre-glacial and non-glacial times;
  • deformation of gravity potential surface;
  • Earth's differential rotation;
  • cyclic palaeomagnetic changes

Summary

Orbital Milankovitch forcing is well established for the late Cenozoic period of continental ice caps. Insolation variations affecting Earth's climate, glacial volume and hence ocean volume are usually advocated to explain corresponding cyclic patterns in climate, sea level, different geochemical variables and sedimentary cycles. For pre-glacial/non-glacial times, this causal mechanism cannot be used to explain sea-level changes and cyclic sedimentary and palaeoenvironmental changes. The orbital forcing variables do not only affect insolation, however. They also affect different fundamental internal mechanisms and conditions: the gravity potential (and hence sea level), differential rotation (and hence sea level, ocean circulation, climate, ocean/atmosphere interaction) and palaeomagnetics (and hence the atmospheric shielding of the Earth). These internal factors are likely to be responsible for the majority of the cyclic changes with characteristic orbital forcing frequencies that are recorded in pre-glacial and non-glacial times. This internal response to orbital forcing probably also played a significant, maybe even dominant, role in Quaternary time.