Nature and Origin of Late Cretaceous Mud-Mounds, North Africa

  1. C. L. V. Monty,
  2. D. W. J. Bosence,
  3. P. H. Bridges and
  4. B. R. Pratt
  1. G. F. Camoin

Published Online: 14 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444304114.ch13

Carbonate Mud-Mounds: Their Origin and Evolution

Carbonate Mud-Mounds: Their Origin and Evolution

How to Cite

Camoin, G. F. (1995) Nature and Origin of Late Cretaceous Mud-Mounds, North Africa, in Carbonate Mud-Mounds: Their Origin and Evolution (eds C. L. V. Monty, D. W. J. Bosence, P. H. Bridges and B. R. Pratt), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444304114.ch13

Author Information

  1. URA, 1208 du CNRS, Centre de Sédimentologie–Paléontologie Universite de Provence, 3 Place V. Hugo, 13331 Marseilles Cedex 3, France

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 14 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 17 JUL 1995

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780865429338

Online ISBN: 9781444304114

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Keywords:

  • growth of rudists and lamellar coral colonies is consistent;
  • cyanobac-teria and related micritization processes;
  • In situ precipitation and entrapment;
  • nature of laterally equivalent and enclosing deposits;
  • ‘stromatactis’

Summary

Carbonate mud mounds are distinctive features of Turonian and Coniacian shelf carbonates cropping out in eastern Algeria and central Tunisia and recognized in the subsurface of adjacent offshore areas. These build-ups grew in an open-shelf depositional environment, probably a few tens of metres deep. The gross vertical zonation (basal bioclastic pile–micritic core–crestal bioclastic limestones) reported in these mounds reflects successive steps of development probably controlled by subtle ecologic changes.

The abundance of microbial fabrics in the core matrix suggests that the origin of the lime muds may be related both to the decay of microbial communities and to an in situ precipitation promoted and/or induced by microbial activity. Since these build-ups do not display any rigid organic framework, their development and preservation probably resulted from the entrapment of locally produced lime muds by microbial mats and their subsequent rapid lithification.