Carbonate Mud-Mounds in the Fort Payne Formation (Lower Carboniferous), Cumberland Saddle Region, Kentucky and Tennessee, USA

  1. C. L. V. Monty,
  2. D. W. J. Bosence,
  3. P. H. Bridges and
  4. B. R. Pratt
  1. D. L. Meyer1,
  2. W. I. Ausich2,
  3. D. T. Bohl1,
  4. W. A. Norris1 and
  5. P. E. Potter1

Published Online: 14 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444304114.ch8

Carbonate Mud-Mounds: Their Origin and Evolution

Carbonate Mud-Mounds: Their Origin and Evolution

How to Cite

Meyer, D. L., Ausich, W. I., Bohl, D. T., Norris, W. A. and Potter, P. E. (2009) Carbonate Mud-Mounds in the Fort Payne Formation (Lower Carboniferous), Cumberland Saddle Region, Kentucky and Tennessee, USA, in Carbonate Mud-Mounds: Their Origin and Evolution (eds C. L. V. Monty, D. W. J. Bosence, P. H. Bridges and B. R. Pratt), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444304114.ch8

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Geology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Geological Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 14 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 17 JUL 1995

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780865429338

Online ISBN: 9781444304114

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Keywords:

  • Carbonate mud-mounds in the Fort Payne Formation;
  • Crinoid holdfasts in growth position occur-wackestone buildups;
  • Waulsortian facies;
  • occurrence of articulated pelmatozoan calyces;
  • presence of bryozoans and crinoids in the submound green shale facies;
  • mound accumulation

Summary

Wackestone buildups up to 14 m thick lie in the lower one-third to one-half of the Lower Carboniferous Fort Payne Formation in the Cumberland Saddle region of south-central Kentucky and north-central Tennessee. In all buildups, an initial mound of fossiliferous green shale is succeeded by massive crinoid-bryozoan wackestones that thin over the mound crest but thicken on the flanks before thinning and terminating laterally. Primary depositional dips on mound flanks of up to approximately 20° and topographic relief are indicated by mound geometry, lithologic contacts, and geopetals. In situ crinoid holdfasts, well-preserved crinoid calyxes, texture and possible source of carbonate mud show the mounds to be autochthonous. Green shale accumulation was probably facilitated through baffling and trapping by bryozoans, and carbonate deposition reflects a shift to dominance by pelmatozoans and an unknown producer of carbonate mud over terrigenous mud supply. Petrographic constituents of mound carbonates suggest that these mounds represent the shallow-water, photic zone, Phase (D) of the Waulsortian facies model.