Late Dinantian (Brigantian) Carbonate Mud-Mounds of the Derbyshire Carbonate Platform

  1. C. L. V. Monty,
  2. D. W. J. Bosence,
  3. P. H. Bridges and
  4. B. R. Pratt
  1. P. Gutteridge

Published Online: 14 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444304114.ch9

Carbonate Mud-Mounds: Their Origin and Evolution

Carbonate Mud-Mounds: Their Origin and Evolution

How to Cite

Gutteridge, P. (1995) Late Dinantian (Brigantian) Carbonate Mud-Mounds of the Derbyshire Carbonate Platform, in Carbonate Mud-Mounds: Their Origin and Evolution (eds C. L. V. Monty, D. W. J. Bosence, P. H. Bridges and B. R. Pratt), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444304114.ch9

Author Information

  1. Cambridge Carbonates Ltd, 11 Newcastle Drive, The Park, Nottingham, NG7 1AA, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 14 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 17 JUL 1995

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780865429338

Online ISBN: 9781444304114

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Keywords:

  • late Dinantian (Brigantian) on the Derbyshire carbonate platform;
  • mounding styles- Tabular mounds, Domical mounds, Laterally accreted mounds, Vertically accreted mounts;
  • Bryozoan wackestone/mudstone;
  • bioclast wackestone with minor packstone;
  • Lithologies overlying the carbonate mud-mounds;
  • Brachiopods and molluscs

Summary

Carbonate mud-mounds developed during the late Dinantian (Brigantian) on the Derbyshire carbonate platform in the shelf interior, associated with the shelf margins, and on the shallow to middle part of an intraplatform ramp. Their growth was controlled by water depth and subsidence: carbonate mudmounds which developed in areas of shallow water and low subsidence grew by lateral accretion, whereas those deposited in areas of deeper water and faster subsidence grew by vertical accretion. The carbonate mud in the mound cores consists of peloidal and homogeneous micrite with local neomorphism to microspar and pseudospar. The carbonate mud was produced on the mound core possibly as a result of microbially mediated precipitation. Stromatactoid cavities formed as a result of the modification of original cavities (probable shelter cavities) by internal erosion of the carbonate mud. The surface of these carbonate mud-mounds may have been bound by a microbial mat which supported steep depositional slopes. Immediately below the surface of the mound core the sediment was semi-consolidated and subjected to internal erosion. The degree of consolidation and lithification increased with increasing depth below the surface of the mound core.