Tidal Lamination and Facies Development in the Macrotidal Flats of Namyang Bay, West Coast of Korea

  1. B. W. Flemming and
  2. A. Bartholomä
  1. Y. A. Park1,
  2. J. T. Wells2,
  3. B. W. Kim1 and
  4. C. R. Alexander3

Published Online: 14 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444304138.ch12

Tidal Signatures in Modern and Ancient Sediments

Tidal Signatures in Modern and Ancient Sediments

How to Cite

Park, Y. A., Wells, J. T., Kim, B. W. and Alexander, C. R. (1995) Tidal Lamination and Facies Development in the Macrotidal Flats of Namyang Bay, West Coast of Korea, in Tidal Signatures in Modern and Ancient Sediments (eds B. W. Flemming and A. Bartholomä), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444304138.ch12

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Oceanography, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151–742 Korea

  2. 2

    Institute of Marine Science, University of North Carolina, 28557, USA

  3. 3

    Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Savannah, GA 31416, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 14 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 11 AUG 1995

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780865429789

Online ISBN: 9781444304138

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Keywords:

  • tidal lamination structures (core slabs);
  • spring-neap tidal cyclicity;
  • high-low turbidity variations;
  • macrotidal lamination and sediment fades;
  • tidal lamination and bedding;
  • lamination warranting closer examination

Summary

Most of the west coast of Korea is fronted by broad intertidal sand- and mud-flats formed in a macrotidal environment that is seasonally subjected to monsoonal winds and intense winter storm surges. Field studies, conducted in about 60 km2 of Namyang Bay, Korea, were undertaken for the dual purpose of describing tidal flat sedimentary facies (surficial and vertical) and tidal lamination structures (core slabs). Surficial sediments coarsen both seawards (from 7.3 phi to 4.5 phi) and with depth, resulting in a decrease in fine silt and clay-sized material. Furthermore, the data highlight the environmental significance of primary fine lamination in this high-tide-range intertidal depositional environment. Three types of primary fine lamination can be recognized on the basis of grain-size and lamina thickness. Variability of lamina thickness appears to be related to the spring–neap tidal cyclicity and high–low turbidity variations.