Experimental and Field Constraints on the Role of Silica–Organic Complexation and Silica–Microbial Interactions during Sediment Diagenesis

  1. Richard H. Worden2 and
  2. Sadoon Morad3
  1. J. B. Fein

Published Online: 17 MAR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444304237.ch9

Quartz Cementation in Sandstones

Quartz Cementation in Sandstones

How to Cite

Fein, J. B. (2009) Experimental and Field Constraints on the Role of Silica–Organic Complexation and Silica–Microbial Interactions during Sediment Diagenesis, in Quartz Cementation in Sandstones (eds R. H. Worden and S. Morad), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444304237.ch9

Editor Information

  1. 2

    School of Geosciences, The Queen's University, Belfast, BT7 1NN, UK

  2. 3

    Sedimentary Geology Research Group, Institute of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Norbyvägen 18 B, S–75236, Uppsala, Sweden

Author Information

  1. University of Notre Dame, Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 17 MAR 2009
  2. Published Print: 3 MAR 2000

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780632054824

Online ISBN: 9781444304237

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Keywords:

  • role of silica–organic complexation and silica–microbial interactions during sediment diagenesis;
  • effect of aqueous organic molecules on rate and extent of quartz dissolution;
  • aqueous silica–organic complexation;
  • mineral surface silica–organic complexation;
  • microbial influences;
  • bacterial surfaces - ability to enhance silicate precipitation

Summary

This paper reviews the results of experiments and field studies that examine the role of silica–organic interactions that may influence Si transport during sediment diagenesis. Three types of influences are reviewed: (i) aqueous silica–organic complexation; (ii) mineral surface silica–organic complexation; and (iii) microbial influences. The available evidence suggests that aqueous silica–organic complexation does not exert a significant effect on Simobilities in the deep subsurface. Mineral surface silica–organic complexation can lead to enhanced quartz dissolution rates, but not at the temperatures, or for the organic acid anions, currently known to exist in sedimentary basin formation waters. The role of microorganisms on Si transport during diagenesis is just beginning to be investigated, although it is possible that microbial influences such as enhanced quartz dissolution due to microbial exudates, or bacterial-induced silicate mineral precipitation, can significantly affect Si mobilities. Although microorganisms have been found at extreme depths within sedimentary basins, more research must be conducted to determine the importance of microbial processes during deep sedimentary diagenesis.