Deltaic Density Currents and Turbidity Deposits Related to Maar Crater Rims and their Importance for Palaeogeographic Reconstruction of the Bakony–Balaton Highland Volcanic Field, Hungary

  1. William McCaffrey,
  2. Ben Kneller and
  3. Jeff Peakall
  1. K. Németh

Published Online: 17 MAR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444304275.ch19

Particulate Gravity Currents

Particulate Gravity Currents

How to Cite

Németh, K. (2001) Deltaic Density Currents and Turbidity Deposits Related to Maar Crater Rims and their Importance for Palaeogeographic Reconstruction of the Bakony–Balaton Highland Volcanic Field, Hungary, in Particulate Gravity Currents (eds W. McCaffrey, B. Kneller and J. Peakall), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444304275.ch19

Editor Information

  1. School of Earth Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, West Yorkshire, UK

Author Information

  1. University of Otago, Geology Department, P.O. Box 56., Dunedin, New Zealand

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 17 MAR 2009
  2. Published Print: 24 APR 2001

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780632059218

Online ISBN: 9781444304275

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Keywords:

  • deltaic density currents and turbidity deposits related to Maar crater rims;
  • Bakony–Balaton Highland Volcanic Field (BBHVF), Hungary;
  • BBHVF - region of low elevation bordered by mesozoic and palaeozoic fault ridge;
  • palaeogeographic reconstruction of BBHVF;
  • primary and reworked volcaniclastic deposits related to Maars;
  • Gilbert-type deltas;
  • lithofacies of Gilbert-type delta fronts;
  • scoria-cone-derived clasts related to large hydromagmatic volcanic field;
  • Maar lake carbonates

Summary

The Bakony–Balaton Highland Volcanic Field (BBHVF), active in the late Miocene, is located in the Central Pannonian Basin of Hungary and consists of around 100 mostly alkaline basaltic eruptive centres. After volcanism, deposition took place in lakes inside the maar craters. Above the primary volcaniclastic deposits, thick maar-lake volcaniclastic sediments occur. The steeply dipping (25–35°), 25–30-cm thick, coarse-grained, inverse-to-normal graded beds of reworked tuff represent the foresets of large Gilbert-delta fronts built into the maar crater lakes of the BBHVF. The coarse-grained beds were deposited by low-density granule debris flows and grain flows. Interstratified 10–15-cm thick beds of fine-grained, cross-bedded, reworked volcaniclastic sandstone and mudstone were probably deposited by turbulent sediment gravity flows. The delta fronts generally indicate transportation from north to south, suggesting a strong N–S trending fluvial system, active during or, shortly after volcanism in the BBHVF. The juvenile fragments in the deltaic sediments are often highly vesiculated, rounded/semirounded glassy lapilli. These suggest that the maar volcanism was related to widespread Strombolian-type explosive volcanism that followed the maar-forming phreatomagmatic events. Deposits derived from scoria cones were easily washed into the steep-walled maar basins and deposited by debris flows.