Sedimentary Traces as Indicator of Temporary Ice-Marginal Channels in the Westphalian Bight, Germany

  1. I. Peter Martini2,
  2. Victor R. Baker3 and
  3. Guillermina Garzón4
  1. J. Herget

Published Online: 17 MAR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444304299.ch16

Flood and Megaflood Processes and Deposits: Recent and Ancient Examples

Flood and Megaflood Processes and Deposits: Recent and Ancient Examples

How to Cite

Herget, J. (2002) Sedimentary Traces as Indicator of Temporary Ice-Marginal Channels in the Westphalian Bight, Germany, in Flood and Megaflood Processes and Deposits: Recent and Ancient Examples (eds I. P. Martini, V. R. Baker and G. Garzón), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444304299.ch16

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Land Resource Science, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada

  2. 3

    Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721–0011, USA

  3. 4

    Dpto de Geodinámica, Fac. de Geología, Universidad of Complutense, 28040 Madrid, Spain

Author Information

  1. Institute of Geography, Ruhr-University Bochum, Universitaetsstr. 150, D-44801 Bochum, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 17 MAR 2009
  2. Published Print: 10 FEB 2002

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780632064045

Online ISBN: 9781444304299

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Keywords:

  • sedimentary traces as indicator of temporary ice-marginal channels in Westphalian Bight, Germany;
  • glaciations of Northern Germany;
  • examples of temporary ice-marginal channels;
  • divide between Emscher and Lippe valleys;
  • exotic fluvial deposits;
  • Nordic sediments beyond maximum ice extension

Summary

In the catchment of the Lippe River, Westphalian Bight of north-west Germany, traces of fluvial sediments and structures have been found at several locations that cannot be explained using palaeoriver reconstructions. The Scandinavian ice-sheet reached and crossed the Lippe River valley during the Saalian glaciation, and several temporary ice-marginal channels may have developed. These channels were fed by meltwater from the ice-sheet and followed several temporary courses. The important difference between these and other ice-marginal channels described in the literature is the temporary character of the Lippe valley channels, as they do not necessarily relate to a stable ice margin. Because of blocked river courses, the presence of temporary palaeolakes is hypothesized as well, although no clear evidence has been found of lacustrine sediments.