Patterns of Clay Mineral Diagenesis in Interbedded Mudrocks and Sandstones: An Example from the Palaeocene of the North Sea

  1. Richard H. Worden3 and
  2. Sadoon Morad4
  1. H. F. Shaw and
  2. D. M. Conybeare

Published Online: 17 MAR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444304336.ch6

Clay Mineral Cements in Sandstones

Clay Mineral Cements in Sandstones

How to Cite

Shaw, H. F. and Conybeare, D. M. (1999) Patterns of Clay Mineral Diagenesis in Interbedded Mudrocks and Sandstones: An Example from the Palaeocene of the North Sea, in Clay Mineral Cements in Sandstones (eds R. H. Worden and S. Morad), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444304336.ch6

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Street, Liverpool L69 3GP, UK

  2. 4

    Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Villa vägen 16, S-752 36 Uppsala, Sweden

Author Information

  1. Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2 BP, UK

  1. Baker Atlas Geoscience, Kettock Lodge, Campus 2, Aberdeen Science and Technology Park, Balgownie Drive, Bridge of Don, Aberdeen AB22 8GU, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 17 MAR 2009
  2. Published Print: 7 OCT 1999

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405105873

Online ISBN: 9781444304336

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Keywords:

  • patterns of clay mineral diagenesis in palaeocene sequence of interbedded deep-marine-fan turbidite sandstones;
  • geological setting of palaeocene sequence;
  • paragenesis of clay minerals in mudrocks and sandstones;
  • paragenetic sequences of Everest palaeocene sandstones;
  • diagenesis in interbedded mudrocks and sandstones

Summary

Patterns of clay mineral (and non-clay mineral) diagenesis in a Palaeocene sequence of interbedded deep-marine-fan turbidite sandstones and mudrocks from the Everest Complex of the North Sea are described in order to compare and contrast the diagenetic processes in these different lithotypes. The study demonstrates broad similarities in the patterns of clay mineral and non-clay mineral diagenesis in the sandstones and mudrocks, except for quartz cementation and dissolution. This suggests generally similar diagenetic processes in which the sandstones and mudrocks behave, at least in part, as relatively ‘open’ systems involving fluid-mediated migration of chemical components within and across the interbedded mudrock–sandstone sequences. The mudrocks appear to display varying degrees of openness depending on their permeability, thickness and composition. This conclusion poses fundamental questions about the behaviour of mudrocks during burial diagenesis that have important consequences for understanding fluid migration and diagenetic processes in sedimentary basins.