Siliciclastic Grain Breakage and Displacement Due to Carbonate Crystal Growth: An Example from the Lueders Formation (Permian) of North-Central Texas, USA

  1. V. Paul Wright2 and
  2. Maurice E. Tucker3
  1. Chris Buczynski and
  2. Henry S. Chafetz

Published Online: 8 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444304497.ch15

Calcretes

Calcretes

How to Cite

Buczynski, C. and Chafetz, H. S. (1991) Siliciclastic Grain Breakage and Displacement Due to Carbonate Crystal Growth: An Example from the Lueders Formation (Permian) of North-Central Texas, USA, in Calcretes (eds V. P. Wright and M. E. Tucker), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444304497.ch15

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Postgraduate Research Institute of Sedimentology (PRIS), University of Reading, UK

  2. 3

    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Durham, UK

Author Information

  1. Department of Geosciences, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 8 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 13 JUN 1991

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780632031870

Online ISBN: 9781444304497

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Keywords:

  • siliciclastic grain breakage and displacement - Lueders Formation;
  • siliciclastic grains in the carbonate-cemented areas display a ‘floating’ texture;
  • ‘jigsaw-puzzle fit’;
  • poikilotopic barite;
  • calcite cementation, occurring in small patches

Summary

The Lueders Formation (mid-Permian) in Baylor County, Texas, is an intercalated suite of fluvial siliciclastic, shallow marine siliciclastic, and shallow marine carbonate strata. There are at least two generations of carbonate cements (probably originally composed of calcite) in the fluvial sandstones where fractured grains are observed. These cements represent the initial stages of caliche formation.

Cementation is envisioned as a two step process. In the first step, calcite cements form from supersaturated fluids in a freshwater, vadose environment as a meniscus cement at grain contacts. Areas of cement formation are restricted to these sites because fluid distribution is restricted to these sites. Stresses generated by the growth of cements at grain contacts are transmitted through and concentrated at quartz/quartz grain point-contacts until the stress is sufficient to fracture quartz grains, even though the ultimate strength of calcite is less than that of quartz, per unit area. This process occurs too rapidly to be accommodated by pressure solution.

In the second phase of cementation, cement nucleation is no longer restricted by vadose conditions. In this phase, calcite growth can no longer result in quartz grain breakage; rather, the quartz grains are dispersed in poikilotopic calcite cement.