The Strontium Isotopic Composition and Origin of Burial Cements in the Lincolnshire Limestone (Bajocian) of Central Lincolnshire, England

  1. Maurice E. Tucker3 and
  2. Robin G. C. Bathurst4
  1. D. Emery1,
  2. J. A. D. Dickson1 and
  3. P. C. Smalley2

Published Online: 29 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444304510.ch22

Carbonate Diagenesis

Carbonate Diagenesis

How to Cite

Emery, D., Dickson, J. A. D. and Smalley, P. C. (1990) The Strontium Isotopic Composition and Origin of Burial Cements in the Lincolnshire Limestone (Bajocian) of Central Lincolnshire, England, in Carbonate Diagenesis (eds M. E. Tucker and R. G. C. Bathurst), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444304510.ch22

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Durham, UK

  2. 4

    Derwen Deg Fawr, Llanfair DC, Ruthin, Clwyd, North Wales, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EQ, UK

  2. 2

    Institute for Energy Technology, Box 40, 2007 Kjeller, Norway

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 29 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 21 AUG 1990

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780632029389

Online ISBN: 9781444304510

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Keywords:

  • strontium isotopic composition and origin;
  • Lincolnshire Limestone;
  • Bajocian marine waters;
  • K-feldspar dissolution;
  • clay recrystallization

Summary

Strontium isotopic composition (87Sr/86Sr) of two petrographically, chemically and isotopically (δ18O and δ13C) distinct phases of burial calcites from the Lincolnshire Limestone are indistinguishable (0·70820 ± 26). The mean 87Sr/86Sr ratio of these phases is considerably more radiogenic than 87Sr/86Sr ratios of Bajocian marine waters (∼ 0·70725). Neither Bajocian marine waters nor meteoric waters buffered by host marine carbonate in the Limestone could have precipitated the burial spars. Radiogenic strontium may have been contributed from K-feldspar dissolution and/or clay recrystallization, either within clastic portions of the Limestone itself, or from major clastic units adjacent to the Limestone. Alternatively, Palaeozoic marine waters or remobilized Palaeozoic marine carbonate and/or sulphate could have supplied the necessary radiogenic strontium.