Chapter 41. George Mackay Brown: “Witch,” “Master Halcrow, Priest,” “A Time to Keep,” and “The Tarn and the Rosary”

  1. Cheryl Alexander Malcolm Associate Professor2 and
  2. David Malcolm Professor3
  1. Gavin Miller Research Fellow

Published Online: 2 MAR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444304770.ch41

A Companion to the British and Irish Short Story

A Companion to the British and Irish Short Story

How to Cite

Miller, G. (2008) George Mackay Brown: “Witch,” “Master Halcrow, Priest,” “A Time to Keep,” and “The Tarn and the Rosary”, in A Companion to the British and Irish Short Story (eds C. A. Malcolm and D. Malcolm), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444304770.ch41

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of American Studies, University of Gdańsk, Poland

  2. 3

    English Institute, University of Gdańsk, Poland

Author Information

  1. English Research Institute, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 2 MAR 2009
  2. Published Print: 10 OCT 2008

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405145374

Online ISBN: 9781444304770

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Keywords:

  • George Mackay Brown - “Witch” and Other Stories;
  • Brown's consequent idealization of pre-Reformation Orcadian life - apparent in “Master Halcrow”;
  • Brown's temporal imagery - introducing a motif as found throughout his stories;
  • antagonism between what Brown calls the “false Gods” of “progress and money and mammon”;
  • Brown re-employing his favored opposition of cyclical Catholic time to progressive Protestant temporality;
  • Brown's vision of spontaneous religion and poetic ceremony

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • References and Further Reading