Diagenetic Evolution of Synorogenic Hybrid and Lithic Arenites (Miocene), Northern Apennines, Italy

  1. Sadoon Morad
  1. E. Spadafora1,†,
  2. L. F. de Ros2,‡,
  3. G. G. Zuffa1,
  4. S. Morad2 and
  5. I. S. Al-aasm3

Published Online: 17 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444304893.ch11

Carbonate Cementation in Sandstones: Distribution Patterns and Geochemical Evolution

Carbonate Cementation in Sandstones: Distribution Patterns and Geochemical Evolution

How to Cite

Spadafora, E., de Ros, L. F., Zuffa, G. G., Morad, S. and Al-aasm, I. S. (1998) Diagenetic Evolution of Synorogenic Hybrid and Lithic Arenites (Miocene), Northern Apennines, Italy, in Carbonate Cementation in Sandstones: Distribution Patterns and Geochemical Evolution (ed S. Morad), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444304893.ch11

Author Information

  1. 1

    Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e Geologico-Ambientali, University of Bologna, via Zamboni, 67, 40127, Bologna, Italy

  2. 2

    Sedimentary Geology Research Group, Institute of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, S-752 36 Uppsala, Sweden

  3. 3

    Department of Earth Sciences, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario N9B 3P4, Canada

  1. AGIP Servizi ELSI, Via Fabiani 1, Ctr Studi S.D. Milanese, 20097 Milano, Italy.

  2. Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Instituto de Geociências, Departamento de Mineralogia e Petrologia, Av. Bento Goncalves, 9500, CEP 91501–970 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil,

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 17 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 29 MAY 1998

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780632047772

Online ISBN: 9781444304893

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Keywords:

  • diagenetic evolution of synorogenic hybrid and lithic arenites;
  • sandstones with abundant carbonate grains in sedimentary sequences;
  • tectonic evolution;
  • burial history of Epi-Ligurian succession;
  • carbonate cements;
  • paragenetic evolution and porosity destruction

Summary

The Bismantova–Termina (Miocene) succession was deposited in satellite basins generated within the collisional orogenic frame of the northern Apennines. The succession is divided into four major sequences separated by regional unconformities. Sequences S1 and S2 are composed of hybrid arenites rich in carbonate bioclasts and deposited in a shallow-marine shelf environment. Sequence S3 contains outer shelf/slope arkosic turbidites interbedded with marls, and sequence S4 is composed of turbiditic arenites rich in carbonate rock fragments, shales and marls deposited in slope and basin settings. Calcite cementation in the shelf arenites started with marine rims and syntaxial overgrowths on echinoderms, and proceeded towards blocky pore-filling cements. The loose packing of the arenites and the isotopic values of these cements (δ18OPDB from −3.6‰ to 0‰ and δ13CPDB from −4.5‰ to +0.5‰) indicate precipitation at shallow depth below the sea floor from marine pore waters influenced by bioclast dissolution. Similar isotopic values in the arkosic slope arenites suggest potential additional derivation of ions for carbonate cementation from the interbedded marls. Small amounts of dolomite, heulandite, chlorite and K-feldspar are related to the early alteration of volcanic rock fragments, heavy minerals and detrital dolomite grains. The isotopic values of calcite cement (δ18OPDB from −5.8‰ to −1.7‰; δ13CPDB from −2.8‰ to +0.1‰) and the tighter packing in the S4 turbiditic arenites indicate cementation under progressive burial, related mostly to the pervasive pressure dissolution of extrabasinal carbonate rock fragments. Maximum burial depth is, however, estimated to be less than 1 km.