Carbonate Cementation—Key to Reservoir Properties of Four Sandstone Levels (Cretaceous) in the Hibernia Oilfield, Jeanne D'Arc Basin, Newfoundland, Canada

  1. Sadoon Morad
  1. R. Hesse and
  2. I. A. Abid

Published Online: 17 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444304893.ch16

Carbonate Cementation in Sandstones: Distribution Patterns and Geochemical Evolution

Carbonate Cementation in Sandstones: Distribution Patterns and Geochemical Evolution

How to Cite

Hesse, R. and Abid, I. A. (1998) Carbonate Cementation—Key to Reservoir Properties of Four Sandstone Levels (Cretaceous) in the Hibernia Oilfield, Jeanne D'Arc Basin, Newfoundland, Canada, in Carbonate Cementation in Sandstones: Distribution Patterns and Geochemical Evolution (ed S. Morad), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444304893.ch16

Author Information

  1. Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, McGill University, 3450 University Street, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 17 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 29 MAY 1998

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780632047772

Online ISBN: 9781444304893

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Keywords:

  • carbonate cementation - key to reservoir properties in Hibernia Oilfield, Canada;
  • sedimentary basins of Grand Banks;
  • depositional environments and stratigraphy;
  • sandstone diagenesis;
  • secondary porosity in Hibernia Field

Summary

The effects of carbonate cementation on the diagenetic evolution of four sandstone reservoir levels in the Hibernia Oilfield of the Jeanne d'Arc Basin, which occur between 2000 and 5000 m subsurface depth, were investigated in a petrographic thin-section and SEM study corroborated by carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses. After precipitation of minor chlorite coatings, siderite, quartz overgrowths and pyrite, early ferroan calcite was the most important cement in the Hibernia Field. It formed after loss of about 10–15% primary porosity by mechanical compaction. Quartz overgrowths continued in parts of the reservoirs, mainly thick sandstone beds not reached by the calcite-precipitating fluids. A major dissolution event predominantly affected calcite but also silicates (feldspar, chert grains, mud clasts, heavy minerals). Subsequent recementation by late ferroan calcite, ferroan saddle dolomite, quartz overgrowths, kaolinite and pyrite further reduced porosity before the emplacement of hydrocarbons.

Secondary porosity development as the main contributor to the present reservoir porosity in Hibernia Field is closely related to the former presence of early calcite cements. The fraction of total porosity which is secondary increases with depth, from 20% in Avalon/Ben Nevis Sandstone (Hauterivian–Albian), to 60% in Catalina Sandstone (Lower Hauterivian), and to >80% in Hibernia Formation (Berriasian to Mid-Valanginian). In the Avalon/Ben Nevis Sandstone the formation of secondary porosity may have been caused by meteoric water influx. In the deeper reservoirs it was caused by acidic pore fluids generated by organic-matter maturation. The present average geothermal gradient of 26°C/km suggests that the most deeply buried sandstone reservoirs in Hibernia (Tithonian Jeanne d'Arc Formation) did not experience temperatures in excess of 130°C.