Chapter 22. The Army, the Navy, and the Napoleonic Wars

  1. Claudia L. Johnson Chair and
  2. Clara Tuite Senior Lecturer
  1. Gillian Russell Reader

Published Online: 6 MAR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444305968.ch22

A Companion to Jane Austen

A Companion to Jane Austen

How to Cite

Russell, G. (2009) The Army, the Navy, and the Napoleonic Wars, in A Companion to Jane Austen (eds C. L. Johnson and C. Tuite), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444305968.ch22

Editor Information

  1. University of Melbourne, Australia

Author Information

  1. Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 6 MAR 2009
  2. Published Print: 2 JAN 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405149099

Online ISBN: 9781444305968

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Keywords:

  • The Army, the Navy, and the Napoleonic Wars;
  • This zone of interaction, as Austen's fiction reveals, had gendered and sexual meanings;
  • Thus Wickham confides in Elizabeth Bennet that it was “the prospect of constant society, and good society” that attracted him to the militia;
  • such a view conditions Austen's representation of the military in Pride and Prejudice Lydia Bennet swoons at the prospective “glories of the camp” at Brighton;
  • Austen's fiction therefore reflects a profoundly ambivalent view of the military, began to change after victories of the Peninsular War and emergence of Wellington as a national hero

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • I

  • II

  • Further Reading