Chapter 1. An Artist Never Quite at Home: Faulkner's Apprehension of Modern Life

  1. John T. Matthews

Published Online: 6 MAR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444306026.ch1

William Faulkner: Seeing Through the South

William Faulkner: Seeing Through the South

How to Cite

Matthews, J. T. (2009) An Artist Never Quite at Home: Faulkner's Apprehension of Modern Life, in William Faulkner: Seeing Through the South, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444306026.ch1

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 6 MAR 2009
  2. Published Print: 2 JAN 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405124812

Online ISBN: 9781444306026

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Keywords:

  • Faulkner's apprehension of modern life;
  • Faulkner's obsession with the Southern past – stunted modern Southern writing for generations;
  • “Artist at Home” and “There Was a Queen”;
  • Faulkner affects a kind of cosmopolitan superiority;
  • Faulkner's spirit of criticism toward his own South would have been braced institutionally by Boni & Liveright's record as publishers as well of politically radical literature;
  • Faulkner's personal politics mainly centrist - his attention to legacy of racial oppression, his sensitivity to class humiliation, and his disgust with the private ownership of wilderness;
  • In Mosquitoes, for good measure - Faulkner tosses in other Freudian hypotheses about artistic production;
  • Faulkner's empathy for characters who, by playing fast and loose, attempt to get out from under the weight of past monumental decrepitude;
  • Faulkner - identifying with a futuristic world as an artist, in an unmistakably “modernistic” style of writing