Chapter 12. Inscribing Identity: The Latin Epigraphic Habit in Late Antiquity

  1. Philip Rousseau
  1. Dennis E. Trout Associate Professor

Published Online: 9 MAR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444306101.ch12

A Companion to Late Antiquity

A Companion to Late Antiquity

How to Cite

Trout, D. E. (2009) Inscribing Identity: The Latin Epigraphic Habit in Late Antiquity, in A Companion to Late Antiquity (ed P. Rousseau), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444306101.ch12

Editor Information

  1. Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Early Christian Studies, The Catholic University of America, USA

Author Information

  1. Classical Studies, University of Missouri-Columbia, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 9 MAR 2009
  2. Published Print: 30 JAN 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405119801

Online ISBN: 9781444306101

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Keywords:

  • inscriptions preserving unique images of late antique life and society;
  • inscribing identity - Latin epigraphic habit;
  • epigraphic corpora and epigraphic curves;
  • epigraphy of Christians;
  • evolution of Vulgar (or demotic) Latin toward Romance languages;
  • Latin of Late Antiquity's non-elites;
  • epigraphic horizons;
  • civic history and public memory

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Epigraphic Corpora and Epigraphic Curves

  • An Epigraphy of Christians

  • Epigraphic Horizons

  • Civic History and Public Memory

  • Crossing Divides

  • Bibliographical Note