Chapter 21. Christianity and the Transformation of Classical Art

  1. Philip Rousseau
  1. Felicity Harley Lecturer Research Fellow

Published Online: 9 MAR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444306101.ch21

A Companion to Late Antiquity

A Companion to Late Antiquity

How to Cite

Harley, F. (2009) Christianity and the Transformation of Classical Art, in A Companion to Late Antiquity (ed P. Rousseau), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444306101.ch21

Editor Information

  1. Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Early Christian Studies, The Catholic University of America, USA

Author Information

  1. University of Melbourne, Australia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 9 MAR 2009
  2. Published Print: 30 JAN 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405119801

Online ISBN: 9781444306101

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Keywords:

  • Christianity and Classical Art;
  • Christianity and making of “Middle Ages”;
  • early Christian art redefined;
  • fading of the dark ages;
  • Philosopher-Christ, Emperor-Christ – portraying Christ as philosopher and teacher;
  • two groups of early Christian sarcophagi - episodes from Passion narratives and institution of the Church;
  • “truly religious” Christian groups of sculpture;
  • Crucifixion - third-century wall graffito from Palatine Hill, Rome;
  • late Roman artists utilizing pictorial language of Roman art - creativity found in earliest Christian art

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Christianity and the Making of the “Middle Ages”

  • Early Christian Art Redefined

  • Fading of the Dark Ages

  • Philosopher-Christ, Emperor-Christ

  • Toward a “Truly Religious” Christian Art

  • The Case of the Crucifixion

  • Conclusion

  • Bibliographical Note