Chapter 4. Earth Mother Myths and Other Ecofeminist Fables: How a Strategic Notion Rose and Fell

  1. Andrea Cornwall Fellow Director,
  2. Elizabeth Harrison anthropologist and
  3. Ann Whitehead Professor contributor feminist
  1. Melissa Leach Professorial Fellow

Published Online: 12 MAR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444306675.ch4

Gender Myths and Feminist Fables: The Struggle for Interpretive Power in Gender and Development

Gender Myths and Feminist Fables: The Struggle for Interpretive Power in Gender and Development

How to Cite

Leach, M. (2009) Earth Mother Myths and Other Ecofeminist Fables: How a Strategic Notion Rose and Fell, in Gender Myths and Feminist Fables: The Struggle for Interpretive Power in Gender and Development (eds A. Cornwall, E. Harrison and A. Whitehead), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444306675.ch4

Editor Information

  1. University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, UK

Author Information

  1. Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9RE, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 MAR 2009
  2. Published Print: 28 MAR 2008

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405169370

Online ISBN: 9781444306675

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Keywords:

  • Earth Mother Myths and Other Ecofeminist Fables: How a Strategic Notion Rose and Fell;
  • women and environment: natural connections?;
  • Women in Development (WID);
  • Women's Environmental Network;
  • world bank's ‘win–win’ approach to environment and gender;
  • assumption of women's natural link with the environment;
  • critiquing natural connections;
  • gender and environment in the new millennium;
  • ‘nurturing women's human capital’;
  • gender-blind perspectives on community

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Women and Environment: Natural Connections?

  • Critiquing Natural Connections

  • Gender and Environment in the New Millennium

  • Some Conclusions

  • References