Chapter 22. Biodiversity of Biting Flies: Implications for Humanity

  1. Robert G. Foottit1 and
  2. Peter H. Adler2
  1. Peter H. Adler

Published Online: 30 MAR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444308211.ch22

Insect Biodiversity: Science and Society

Insect Biodiversity: Science and Society

How to Cite

Adler, P. H. (2009) Biodiversity of Biting Flies: Implications for Humanity, in Insect Biodiversity: Science and Society (eds R. G. Foottit and P. H. Adler), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444308211.ch22

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Environmental Health National Program (Biodiversity), Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, K. W. Neatby Bldg., 960 Carling Ave., Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C6, Canada

  2. 2

    Department of Entomology, Soils & Plant Sciences, Clemson University, Box 340315, 114 Long Hall, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0315, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Entomology, Soils & Plant Sciences, Clemson University, Box 340315, 114 Long Hall, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0315, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 MAR 2009
  2. Published Print: 6 MAR 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405151429

Online ISBN: 9781444308211

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Keywords:

  • biodiversity of biting flies - implications for humanity;
  • biting flies and diseases;
  • female ceratopogonids transmitting 66 viruses;
  • The family Ceratopogonidae - 5923 described, extant species in 110 genera;
  • biting fly-borne diseases of humans and domestic animals - dipteran families and diseases within each family;
  • 680-plus species of worldwide family Hippoboscidae - divided among three discrete families;
  • rationale for biodiversity studies of blood-sucking flies;
  • biodiversity exploration;
  • societal consequences of disregarding biodiversity

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Numbers and Estimates

  • Overview of Biting Flies and Diseases

  • Rationale for Biodiversity Studies of Blood-Sucking Flies

  • Biodiversity Exploration

  • Societal Consequences of Disregarding Biodiversity

  • Present and Future Concerns

  • Conclusions

  • Acknowledgments

  • References