Chapter 23. Reconciling Ethical and Scientific Issues for Insect Conservation

  1. Robert G. Foottit3 and
  2. Peter H. Adler4
  1. Michael J. Samways1,2

Published Online: 30 MAR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444308211.ch23

Insect Biodiversity: Science and Society

Insect Biodiversity: Science and Society

How to Cite

Samways, M. J. (2009) Reconciling Ethical and Scientific Issues for Insect Conservation, in Insect Biodiversity: Science and Society (eds R. G. Foottit and P. H. Adler), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444308211.ch23

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Environmental Health National Program (Biodiversity), Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, K. W. Neatby Bldg., 960 Carling Ave., Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C6, Canada

  2. 4

    Department of Entomology, Soils & Plant Sciences, Clemson University, Box 340315, 114 Long Hall, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0315, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Entomology and Centre for Agricultural Biodiversity, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, 7602 Matieland, South Africa

  2. 2

    Department of Conservation Ecology and Entomology, and Centre for Invasion Biology, Stellenbosch University, Matieland 7602, South Africa

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 MAR 2009
  2. Published Print: 6 MAR 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405151429

Online ISBN: 9781444308211

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Keywords:

  • reconciling ethical and scientific issues for insect conservation;
  • sensitive use of ecosystem services;
  • utilitarian level of practicality - currently most persuasive for policy makers;
  • intrinsic value and conservation action;
  • insects and ecosystems;
  • insects and food webs;
  • importance of maintaining landscape connectance;
  • challenge of complementary surrogates

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Valuing Nature

  • Insects and Ecosystems

  • Two Challenges

  • Synthesizing Deeper Values and Practical Issues

  • Summary

  • Acknowledgments

  • References