Chapter Twenty-One. The Irritating Statues and Contradictory Portraits of Julius Caesar

  1. Miriam Griffin Emeritus Fellow
  1. Paul Zanker FBA Professor Professor Emeritus Director

Published Online: 5 MAY 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444308440.ch21

A Companion to Julius Caesar

A Companion to Julius Caesar

How to Cite

Zanker, P. (2009) The Irritating Statues and Contradictory Portraits of Julius Caesar, in A Companion to Julius Caesar (ed M. Griffin), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444308440.ch21

Editor Information

  1. Somerville College, Oxford, UK

Author Information

  1. Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, Italy

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 5 MAY 2009
  2. Published Print: 10 APR 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405149235

Online ISBN: 9781444308440

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Keywords:

  • The irritating statues and contradictory portraits;
  • Once Caesar had attained the supreme position - heaped with honors on a scale;
  • ambitious statues of dictator - aims and effects;
  • statue of “demigod” with the globe - first controversial statue set up to Caesar on the Capitol, at his return from Africa, in April 46;
  • Caesar entering Forum Iulium as autocratic Imperator - Caesar dedicated his new Forum as crowning completion of his fourfold Triumph;
  • statue “beside the kings” – and beside the tyrannicide - after the Battle of Munda (March 17, 45 BC);
  • dictator, his statue crowned - reconstruction of Curia Iulia as a kind of annexe to the Forum Iulium;
  • Caesar's rather conventional self-representation;
  • Octavian crowning Caesar's statues with a star;
  • figure of Caesar becoming problematic, after the “restoration of the Republic”

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • The Ambitious Statues of the Dictator: Aims and Effects

  • The Many Faces of Caesar

  • Further Reading