Chapter 11. Hard-Boiled/Noir Fiction

  1. David Seed Professor
  1. Lee Horsley Reader

Published Online: 5 NOV 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444310108.ch11

A Companion to Twentieth-Century United States Fiction

A Companion to Twentieth-Century United States Fiction

How to Cite

Horsley, L. (2009) Hard-Boiled/Noir Fiction, in A Companion to Twentieth-Century United States Fiction (ed D. Seed), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444310108.ch11

Editor Information

  1. University of Liverpool, UK

Author Information

  1. Lancaster University, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 5 NOV 2009
  2. Published Print: 16 OCT 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405146913

Online ISBN: 9781444310108

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Keywords:

  • hard-boiled/Noir fiction;
  • American crime fiction “hard-boiled” and “noir” - evocative labels;
  • traditional British detective (Sherlock Holmes) - a detached figure;
  • Carroll John Daly's Race Williams in the earliest Black Mask stories (1923–34);
  • noir protagonist - manifestations of life's randomness and absurdity;
  • Black Mask and Early Hard-Boiled Crime Fiction;
  • The Glass Key (1931), Ned Beaumont - lacking partial legitimation of the private eye;
  • postwar America and paperback revolution;
  • some contemporary transformations;
  • sense of ultimate helplessness - in feminist crime fiction

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Black Mask and Early Hard-Boiled Crime Fiction

  • Postwar America and the Paperback Revolution

  • Some Contemporary Transformations

  • References and Further Reading