Chapter 13. Black Humor Fiction

  1. David Seed Professor
  1. David Seed Professor

Published Online: 5 NOV 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444310108.ch13

A Companion to Twentieth-Century United States Fiction

A Companion to Twentieth-Century United States Fiction

How to Cite

Seed, D. (2009) Black Humor Fiction, in A Companion to Twentieth-Century United States Fiction (ed D. Seed), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444310108.ch13

Editor Information

  1. University of Liverpool, UK

Author Information

  1. University of Liverpool, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 5 NOV 2009
  2. Published Print: 16 OCT 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405146913

Online ISBN: 9781444310108

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Keywords:

  • Black humor fiction;
  • “Black humor” - denoting African American humor;
  • The Magic Christian (1960) - pattern of reductive satirical exposure;
  • Ken Kesey's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1962) and Elliott Baker's A Fine Madness (1964);
  • Nabokov's Lolita (1955) - role-playing central to black humor;
  • asylums as settings, and madness as motif, central to black humor fiction;
  • predictable emotional state of wartime – fear;
  • protagonist's increasing bewilderment in The Crying of Lot 49 (1966);
  • Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five - difficulties in approaching a war subject;
  • Invisible Man (1952) anticipating black humor in a surreal narrative

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • References and Further Reading