Chapter 12. Institutions of Poetry in Postwar Britain

  1. Nigel Alderman Assistant Professor2 and
  2. C. D. Blanton Assistant Professor3
  1. Peter Middleton Professor

Published Online: 23 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444310306.ch12

A Concise Companion to Postwar British and Irish Poetry

A Concise Companion to Postwar British and Irish Poetry

How to Cite

Middleton, P. (2009) Institutions of Poetry in Postwar Britain, in A Concise Companion to Postwar British and Irish Poetry (eds N. Alderman and C. D. Blanton), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444310306.ch12

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Mount Holyoke College, USA

  2. 3

    University of California, Berkeley, USA

Author Information

  1. University of Southampton, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 23 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 10 APR 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405129244

Online ISBN: 9781444310306

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Keywords:

  • institutions of poetry in postwar Britain;
  • poetry may be, in the words of Hugh MacDiarmid's encyclopedic poem - In Memoriam James Joyce, “human existence come to life” in the flower and fruit;
  • Literary criticism of poetry tending to treat poem as xif its roots in publishing - this idealization of poem visualized as a black text printed on white pages of a book of related poems by a single author;
  • scenes of aesthetic innovation and generation of poem's semantic repertoire - often takes place at other sites than the book-length collection of poems;
  • Motion's win points to the future - becoming one of the most influential figures in British poetry;
  • all committed poets - says Prynne want not just to be read passively (as a diversion or entertainment) but for their work to encourage transformative action;
  • Greenlaw's poem “Guidebooks to the Alhambra” - is one of three she published in this issue of Poetry Review;
  • Howard Belsey - challenging the belief that there is a “redemptive humanity” in art and scorns the idea of beauty in art and “mytheme of artist as autonomous individual with privileged insight into the human”

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Acknowledgments

  • Further Reading